Presentation Title

Copper (II) Complexes Potential Antitumor Treatment in Glioblastoma

Start Date

12-11-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

12-11-2016 5:00 PM

Location

HUB 302-#67

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Glioblastoma is a common and aggressive brain tumor, with approximately 200,000 cases per year in the U.S. The median survival rate for a patient treated with a combination of, the most commonly used drug, Temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy is one to two years. Current research is being conducted to find better alternatives for the current drug therapy-with copper being important for many biological pathways, copper (II) complexes have been reported as exhibiting substantial anticancer activity in other types of tumors. It was hypothesized that copper compounds synthesized in lab would exhibit similar cytoxic in vitro effects in glioma cells as those observed when the compounds were tested against lung cancer cell line (A549). Murine glioma cells (GL261), syngeneic to human glioblastoma, were cultured in vitro with appropriate media and grown for testing. A sulphorhodamine-B (SRB) assay was used to test the cytotoxicity levels in small concentrations of four copper compounds [4,4’-dimethylbipyCuCl2 (1), 6,6’-dimethylbipyCuCl2 (2), 2,9-disecbutylphenCuCl2 (3), and 2,9-dimethylphenCuCl2 (H2O) (4)] against GL261. Results of the SRB testing were similar to those previously obtained from A549 cell lines. Although compounds 1, 2, and 3 yielded higher average IC50 values in glioma (17.76 μM, 0.367 μM and 1.60 μM respectively) than when tested against A549 cells (5.0 μM, 0.20 μM, 0.20 μM), compound 4exhibited similar cytoxicity against both cell lines (IC50 < 0.2 μM). Compounds 1-4 also exhibited less cytoxicity against non-cancerous Human Foreskin Fibroblast (HFF) cells in comparison to the GL261 cell line. Based on these results, compound 4 will be further investigated to elucidate the mechanism by which it initiates cell death in GL261 cells.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Copper (II) Complexes Potential Antitumor Treatment in Glioblastoma

HUB 302-#67

Glioblastoma is a common and aggressive brain tumor, with approximately 200,000 cases per year in the U.S. The median survival rate for a patient treated with a combination of, the most commonly used drug, Temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy is one to two years. Current research is being conducted to find better alternatives for the current drug therapy-with copper being important for many biological pathways, copper (II) complexes have been reported as exhibiting substantial anticancer activity in other types of tumors. It was hypothesized that copper compounds synthesized in lab would exhibit similar cytoxic in vitro effects in glioma cells as those observed when the compounds were tested against lung cancer cell line (A549). Murine glioma cells (GL261), syngeneic to human glioblastoma, were cultured in vitro with appropriate media and grown for testing. A sulphorhodamine-B (SRB) assay was used to test the cytotoxicity levels in small concentrations of four copper compounds [4,4’-dimethylbipyCuCl2 (1), 6,6’-dimethylbipyCuCl2 (2), 2,9-disecbutylphenCuCl2 (3), and 2,9-dimethylphenCuCl2 (H2O) (4)] against GL261. Results of the SRB testing were similar to those previously obtained from A549 cell lines. Although compounds 1, 2, and 3 yielded higher average IC50 values in glioma (17.76 μM, 0.367 μM and 1.60 μM respectively) than when tested against A549 cells (5.0 μM, 0.20 μM, 0.20 μM), compound 4exhibited similar cytoxicity against both cell lines (IC50 < 0.2 μM). Compounds 1-4 also exhibited less cytoxicity against non-cancerous Human Foreskin Fibroblast (HFF) cells in comparison to the GL261 cell line. Based on these results, compound 4 will be further investigated to elucidate the mechanism by which it initiates cell death in GL261 cells.