Presentation Title

Repurposing FDA-approved drugs as a novel broad-spectrum combination therapy

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-24

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance has become a significant problem among hospital environments as well as for humans with recurrent microbial infections. Additionally, a new small molecule drug can take up to 15 years to become FDA-approved. An unmet need exists for new antibiotic therapies that can be effective and developed rapidly to combat antimicrobial resistance. This study aims to discover the broad-spectrum antibiotic capabilities of 10 small molecule drugs with the goal of discovering a novel combination therapy consisting of 2 drugs that can be re-purposed and serve as an effective broad-spectrum antibiotic. The antimicrobial efficacy of 10 small molecule drugs on 11 species of bacteria was assessed using an in vitro assay whereby these drugs were dropped onto a lawn of bacteria and the zone of inhibition was analyzed. Subsequently, an in vivo assay was then performed whereby Drosophila melanogaster flies were infected with the same 10 species of bacteria and the efficacy of the same 11 drugs was assessed. Survivorship of Drosophila was assessed after a period of 18 hours. 2 out of the initial 10 drugs significantly contributed to creating zones of inhibition on bacterial lawns as well as decreasing the sensitivity of Drosophila to bacterial infections.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Repurposing FDA-approved drugs as a novel broad-spectrum combination therapy

HUB 302-24

Antimicrobial resistance has become a significant problem among hospital environments as well as for humans with recurrent microbial infections. Additionally, a new small molecule drug can take up to 15 years to become FDA-approved. An unmet need exists for new antibiotic therapies that can be effective and developed rapidly to combat antimicrobial resistance. This study aims to discover the broad-spectrum antibiotic capabilities of 10 small molecule drugs with the goal of discovering a novel combination therapy consisting of 2 drugs that can be re-purposed and serve as an effective broad-spectrum antibiotic. The antimicrobial efficacy of 10 small molecule drugs on 11 species of bacteria was assessed using an in vitro assay whereby these drugs were dropped onto a lawn of bacteria and the zone of inhibition was analyzed. Subsequently, an in vivo assay was then performed whereby Drosophila melanogaster flies were infected with the same 10 species of bacteria and the efficacy of the same 11 drugs was assessed. Survivorship of Drosophila was assessed after a period of 18 hours. 2 out of the initial 10 drugs significantly contributed to creating zones of inhibition on bacterial lawns as well as decreasing the sensitivity of Drosophila to bacterial infections.