Presentation Title

Designing a Model System for Long Range Charge Transfer Using Bioinspired Electrets

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-48

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

In nature, proteins containing permanent dipoles, made by amide and hydrogen bonding, are some of the best examples for charge transfer. These particular proteins, however, are difficult to use for electronic and/or energetic material because: 1) they contain large band gaps, 2) are material sensitive to the environment, and 3) charge transfer occurs via tunneling thus limiting its efficiency to about 2 nanometers. Using bio-inspired molecular electrets, our goal is to synthesize a model system allowing charge transfer to occur longer than 2 nanometers. Anthranilamides (Aa) serve as a promising motif by being able to adjust the redox properties by varying the electron donating substituent on the distal positions, due to its intrinsic dipole moment. Therefore, these Aa’s are suitable for an electron donor-bridge system for “hole hopping” --system with a suitable electron acceptor or chromophore. Synthesizing a specific system provides insight into the effect of minimizing charge recombination by moving the electron and hole pair away from each other, thus improving the efficiency of the system. Compared to materials like metals, using bio-inspired electrets provides an environmentally-friendly alternative to means of solar energy conservation.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Designing a Model System for Long Range Charge Transfer Using Bioinspired Electrets

HUB 302-48

In nature, proteins containing permanent dipoles, made by amide and hydrogen bonding, are some of the best examples for charge transfer. These particular proteins, however, are difficult to use for electronic and/or energetic material because: 1) they contain large band gaps, 2) are material sensitive to the environment, and 3) charge transfer occurs via tunneling thus limiting its efficiency to about 2 nanometers. Using bio-inspired molecular electrets, our goal is to synthesize a model system allowing charge transfer to occur longer than 2 nanometers. Anthranilamides (Aa) serve as a promising motif by being able to adjust the redox properties by varying the electron donating substituent on the distal positions, due to its intrinsic dipole moment. Therefore, these Aa’s are suitable for an electron donor-bridge system for “hole hopping” --system with a suitable electron acceptor or chromophore. Synthesizing a specific system provides insight into the effect of minimizing charge recombination by moving the electron and hole pair away from each other, thus improving the efficiency of the system. Compared to materials like metals, using bio-inspired electrets provides an environmentally-friendly alternative to means of solar energy conservation.