Presentation Title

Cell-to-Cell Interactions between Natural Killer Cells and Target Cells (A High School Intern’s NanoMedicine Research Project at the Houston Methodist Research Institute)

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-157

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Understanding the basis of cell-to-cell interactions is crucial in developing a treatment plan for cancer. This paper reports a nanomedicine research project conducted by a high school senior at the Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute. During my summer internship, I focused on replicating the processes in which natural killer cells find, target, and terminate cancer cells. Under Professor Qin’s guidance, I based my experiment on making the ideal cell-capturing devices to investigate cell-to-cell interactions for cancer treatments. To begin, I created a flexible device made primarily from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on a silicon substrate. The experimental procedures include the following. First, I drew out an ideal device pattern using a computer software called AutoCAD. After which, we sent our design to a mask maker, Photo Sciences Inc., CA, USA, where the pattern was printed onto glass. The fabricated photomasks were then sent back to us for experimentation. I then proceeded to the next step: fabricating the PDMS mixture by combining 10 parts PDMS and 1 part of the curing agent, Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning, MI, USA). The solution was poured onto the photomasks and placed inside a 70°C heating chamber for 1 hour. Lastly, the PDMS was cut and peeled off of the photomask before punched with 4-mm inlets and 1.5-mm outlets. Prior to cell loading, each device is degassed with a vacuum chamber and rinsed with cell media. Afterwards, I introduced 5 µL of the cell suspension (~2×106 cells/mL) through the device inlets by using a pipet. I then waited 2 minutes for the cells to cling onto the appropriate docks before rinsing the devices with cell culture medium. I then proceeded with culturing NK-92, K562, and SK-BR-3 (ATCC, VA, USA) cells in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 at 37°C. Later, I stained the SK-BR-3 cells with 5 µM CellTracker Green or CellTracker Red in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 15 minutes. I used an EVOS auto cell imaging system (Life Technologies) to image the migration. The machine captured high-definition time lapse photos ranging from 10× or 20× objective lens at 10- 30-minute intervals for 2–6 hour. Our data supported the fact that NK cells worked independently when lysing target cells. It also demonstrates the ideal process of termination: locating the target before delivering a lethal dose. It is expected that these observations will advance the field of cancer research by providing the necessary background for future developments.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Cell-to-Cell Interactions between Natural Killer Cells and Target Cells (A High School Intern’s NanoMedicine Research Project at the Houston Methodist Research Institute)

HUB 302-157

Understanding the basis of cell-to-cell interactions is crucial in developing a treatment plan for cancer. This paper reports a nanomedicine research project conducted by a high school senior at the Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute. During my summer internship, I focused on replicating the processes in which natural killer cells find, target, and terminate cancer cells. Under Professor Qin’s guidance, I based my experiment on making the ideal cell-capturing devices to investigate cell-to-cell interactions for cancer treatments. To begin, I created a flexible device made primarily from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on a silicon substrate. The experimental procedures include the following. First, I drew out an ideal device pattern using a computer software called AutoCAD. After which, we sent our design to a mask maker, Photo Sciences Inc., CA, USA, where the pattern was printed onto glass. The fabricated photomasks were then sent back to us for experimentation. I then proceeded to the next step: fabricating the PDMS mixture by combining 10 parts PDMS and 1 part of the curing agent, Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning, MI, USA). The solution was poured onto the photomasks and placed inside a 70°C heating chamber for 1 hour. Lastly, the PDMS was cut and peeled off of the photomask before punched with 4-mm inlets and 1.5-mm outlets. Prior to cell loading, each device is degassed with a vacuum chamber and rinsed with cell media. Afterwards, I introduced 5 µL of the cell suspension (~2×106 cells/mL) through the device inlets by using a pipet. I then waited 2 minutes for the cells to cling onto the appropriate docks before rinsing the devices with cell culture medium. I then proceeded with culturing NK-92, K562, and SK-BR-3 (ATCC, VA, USA) cells in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 at 37°C. Later, I stained the SK-BR-3 cells with 5 µM CellTracker Green or CellTracker Red in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 15 minutes. I used an EVOS auto cell imaging system (Life Technologies) to image the migration. The machine captured high-definition time lapse photos ranging from 10× or 20× objective lens at 10- 30-minute intervals for 2–6 hour. Our data supported the fact that NK cells worked independently when lysing target cells. It also demonstrates the ideal process of termination: locating the target before delivering a lethal dose. It is expected that these observations will advance the field of cancer research by providing the necessary background for future developments.