Presentation Title

Shifts in the Sociology student population

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-100

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

In 2008 the United States went through a recession considered the largest downturn since the Great Depression. Since then there has been a significant increase in higher educational enrollment as well as an emphasis for institutions to increase their more vocationally-oriented departments which resulted in cut backs in some sociology departments. With some college administrators going so far as to advocate removing their institutions sociology department completely it is advantageous for sociology to study any shifts in the student population to better serve them. Analyzing a previous longitudinal study collected on senior college students in 2005 and 2012, which offers a comparison of sociology students before and after the recession has shown a rise in minorities (25% to 40%) and significant drops in vocational reasoning for choosing sociology without providing adequate explanations. By connecting their obtained data with data on ethnicity in relation with first generation college studies in sociology it was concluded that the 2008 recession created a more conceptually focused group of incoming sociology students who significantly focused on creating social change rather than vocational gains.

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Shifts in the Sociology student population

HUB 302-100

In 2008 the United States went through a recession considered the largest downturn since the Great Depression. Since then there has been a significant increase in higher educational enrollment as well as an emphasis for institutions to increase their more vocationally-oriented departments which resulted in cut backs in some sociology departments. With some college administrators going so far as to advocate removing their institutions sociology department completely it is advantageous for sociology to study any shifts in the student population to better serve them. Analyzing a previous longitudinal study collected on senior college students in 2005 and 2012, which offers a comparison of sociology students before and after the recession has shown a rise in minorities (25% to 40%) and significant drops in vocational reasoning for choosing sociology without providing adequate explanations. By connecting their obtained data with data on ethnicity in relation with first generation college studies in sociology it was concluded that the 2008 recession created a more conceptually focused group of incoming sociology students who significantly focused on creating social change rather than vocational gains.