Presentation Title

Electrochemical Oxidation for Improved Joint Implants

Faculty Mentor

Yong X. Gan, William Gale, Lee Etchels

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

HARBESON 22

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Over 356,704 joint replacements happen yearly in the U.S and the U.K combined. Therefore nanotechnology practices have begun to improve joint implants by coating commercially pure titanium with nano-tubes. Such application have demonstrated an increase on the implant topography. The porous coating allows for cellular penetration, nutrients diffusion as well as morphology and bio-activity, thus, making them much suitable bio-materials. Currently thermal spraying, a dry coating method, is their dominant coating process; 41% of the total coating jobs done by this process is performed on bio-materials alone. Due to the environmental impact of carbon footprint, alternative process for nano-tubes coating have been suggested. Many dry methods inherently require vastly bigger energy consumption than the multi-step wet processes[1]. Thus, the study focuses on coating the commercially pure titanium with dioxide nano-tubes via electrochemistry, a wet process, and performing tensile testing, to first prove that the mechanical properties of the implants will not be compromised if the current coating process is replaced. Tensile testing provided the elongation of the specimen induced by a load over a period of time, which generated the stress versus strain graph. By obtaining the stress versus strain graph the specimen's mechanical properties, such as the modulus of elasticity, were calculated. The stress versus strain graph follows the elastic deformation curve and allowed to calculate the modulus of elasticity of the samples which has helped demonstrate that the implants under this coating process are acceptable biomaterials. The calculation were compared to the mechanical properties of the bones as well as of titanium alone and the samples’ mechanical properties are acceptable under this parameters. Which demonstrate that replacing the current thermal spraying method, with electrochemical oxidation will not compromise the material properties of the specimen; making them suitable materials for biomedical application. Based on this results electrochemical oxidation may have a potential for improving the fixation and carbon footprint of medical implants, and more involved testing is now justified.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Electrochemical Oxidation for Improved Joint Implants

HARBESON 22

Over 356,704 joint replacements happen yearly in the U.S and the U.K combined. Therefore nanotechnology practices have begun to improve joint implants by coating commercially pure titanium with nano-tubes. Such application have demonstrated an increase on the implant topography. The porous coating allows for cellular penetration, nutrients diffusion as well as morphology and bio-activity, thus, making them much suitable bio-materials. Currently thermal spraying, a dry coating method, is their dominant coating process; 41% of the total coating jobs done by this process is performed on bio-materials alone. Due to the environmental impact of carbon footprint, alternative process for nano-tubes coating have been suggested. Many dry methods inherently require vastly bigger energy consumption than the multi-step wet processes[1]. Thus, the study focuses on coating the commercially pure titanium with dioxide nano-tubes via electrochemistry, a wet process, and performing tensile testing, to first prove that the mechanical properties of the implants will not be compromised if the current coating process is replaced. Tensile testing provided the elongation of the specimen induced by a load over a period of time, which generated the stress versus strain graph. By obtaining the stress versus strain graph the specimen's mechanical properties, such as the modulus of elasticity, were calculated. The stress versus strain graph follows the elastic deformation curve and allowed to calculate the modulus of elasticity of the samples which has helped demonstrate that the implants under this coating process are acceptable biomaterials. The calculation were compared to the mechanical properties of the bones as well as of titanium alone and the samples’ mechanical properties are acceptable under this parameters. Which demonstrate that replacing the current thermal spraying method, with electrochemical oxidation will not compromise the material properties of the specimen; making them suitable materials for biomedical application. Based on this results electrochemical oxidation may have a potential for improving the fixation and carbon footprint of medical implants, and more involved testing is now justified.