Presentation Title

A Study of the Treatment of Produced Water for Agricultural Irrigation Using an Electrochemical Reactor

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Luis Cabrales

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

HARBESON 27

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

The ongoing California drought has continued to devastate many agricultural regions. Due to this devastation, any way to conserve and reuse water is imperative to the community and agricultural life. One unconventional source of water in the southern San Joaquin Valley is produced water, a by-product of oil and gas production. On average, 7 to 10 barrels of produced water are obtained per barrel of oil. This work is related to the examination of treated oilfield water application on forages and soils. CSUB is involved in the acquisition and treatment of the oilfield water; the Fresno State team would then apply the waters in forage fields located in McFarland. For this project, an electrochemical reactor is used to remove and oxidize the oil content of produced water. The electrochemical treatment is a continuous, chemical free, and low energy water treatment process. The intention of this research is to test the effectiveness of the electrochemical reactor on produced water. The treatment consists of running produced water through a combination of flotation and oxidation. A batch reactor is used to find the optimal electrical current at which the treatment can be used more efficiently. The electrochemical reactor produced micron-sized bubbles which lift the suspended oil particles to the surface for removal. The second part of the treatment consists of another electrochemical reactor confined in a pipe which causes direct oxidation of organic molecules. Several reactive species are produced, which help oxidize oil components. The results showed effective removal of organic contaminants in the water. The chemical oxygen demand decreased significantly after each step of the process. In conclusion, treated produced water is clean enough to be reused in agricultural irrigation. The chemical free process is a safe and simple option for farmers and could be the solution to many water shortage issues.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

A Study of the Treatment of Produced Water for Agricultural Irrigation Using an Electrochemical Reactor

HARBESON 27

The ongoing California drought has continued to devastate many agricultural regions. Due to this devastation, any way to conserve and reuse water is imperative to the community and agricultural life. One unconventional source of water in the southern San Joaquin Valley is produced water, a by-product of oil and gas production. On average, 7 to 10 barrels of produced water are obtained per barrel of oil. This work is related to the examination of treated oilfield water application on forages and soils. CSUB is involved in the acquisition and treatment of the oilfield water; the Fresno State team would then apply the waters in forage fields located in McFarland. For this project, an electrochemical reactor is used to remove and oxidize the oil content of produced water. The electrochemical treatment is a continuous, chemical free, and low energy water treatment process. The intention of this research is to test the effectiveness of the electrochemical reactor on produced water. The treatment consists of running produced water through a combination of flotation and oxidation. A batch reactor is used to find the optimal electrical current at which the treatment can be used more efficiently. The electrochemical reactor produced micron-sized bubbles which lift the suspended oil particles to the surface for removal. The second part of the treatment consists of another electrochemical reactor confined in a pipe which causes direct oxidation of organic molecules. Several reactive species are produced, which help oxidize oil components. The results showed effective removal of organic contaminants in the water. The chemical oxygen demand decreased significantly after each step of the process. In conclusion, treated produced water is clean enough to be reused in agricultural irrigation. The chemical free process is a safe and simple option for farmers and could be the solution to many water shortage issues.