Presentation Title

Designing and Testing a Small Scale Solar-Powered RO Water Treatment System (DROWT)

Faculty Mentor

Reza Baghaei Lakeh, Ali Sharbat

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

HARBESON 31

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Frequent drought conditions, and the depletion of surface and ground water sources present many challenges to California. The state relies heavily on water imported from the north and the Colorado River. The transportation of this water uses grid power and as a result, leaves a large carbon footprint. One solution for alleviating the state’s dependency on the import of water is water reclamation. At Cal Poly Pomona, the DROWT (Decentralized Renewable Off-Grid Wastewater Treatment) team has been developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater is water that is drained from sinks, laundry machines, dishwashers, and showers; excluding the wastewater from toilets and kitchen sinks. Treating and reusing greywater on site reduces the carbon footprint due to transportation, further decreased by the use of solar energy to power the system. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment process: microfiltration, solar-driven reverse osmosis, and ultraviolet disinfection. The developed system is capable of reclaiming 90-100 gal of water per day, equating to 60% of residential greywater waste, with a recovery rate of 62%. Large suspended particles (particles of dirt, food, etc) and dissolved organic and inorganic contaminants are removed as the water is treated. The quality of water produced by the system is demonstrated to agree with the recommended guidelines for reclaimed water.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Designing and Testing a Small Scale Solar-Powered RO Water Treatment System (DROWT)

HARBESON 31

Frequent drought conditions, and the depletion of surface and ground water sources present many challenges to California. The state relies heavily on water imported from the north and the Colorado River. The transportation of this water uses grid power and as a result, leaves a large carbon footprint. One solution for alleviating the state’s dependency on the import of water is water reclamation. At Cal Poly Pomona, the DROWT (Decentralized Renewable Off-Grid Wastewater Treatment) team has been developing an off-grid solar-powered greywater treatment system for non-potable use in single households. Greywater is water that is drained from sinks, laundry machines, dishwashers, and showers; excluding the wastewater from toilets and kitchen sinks. Treating and reusing greywater on site reduces the carbon footprint due to transportation, further decreased by the use of solar energy to power the system. The system is comprised of a three-stage treatment process: microfiltration, solar-driven reverse osmosis, and ultraviolet disinfection. The developed system is capable of reclaiming 90-100 gal of water per day, equating to 60% of residential greywater waste, with a recovery rate of 62%. Large suspended particles (particles of dirt, food, etc) and dissolved organic and inorganic contaminants are removed as the water is treated. The quality of water produced by the system is demonstrated to agree with the recommended guidelines for reclaimed water.