Presentation Title

Potential Repurposing of Reverse Osmosis Concentrate for Energy Storage Applications

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Reza B. Lakeh

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

HARBESON 49

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Water desalination plants spend large amounts of money disposing wastewater because of environmental restrictions imposed by the government. Current options for disposing includes surface seawater discharge, sewer discharge, and deep well injections. Due to the high salinity of the wastewater it can cause a dramatic change in local ecosystems and add unwanted chemicals in any body of water. Deep well injections result in more earthquakes and can have a negative long term environmental impact.

Recently, there has been a push to find a way to repurpose the reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC). It has been used to grow bacteria in biology labs and for irrigation on salt-tolerant plants such as onions and certain grapevines. The ROC also contains metals and minerals that can be recovered up to 90% using ion flotation. The solute can be extracted from the reverse osmosis concentrate by evaporation. The solute contains various types of salts that can be used for road deicing and in the chemical industry. Other uses for the solute include cement manufacturing and road paving.

In this project, the ROC solute is looked at for a different repurposing effort. Currently, there has been a growing focus on grid-scale energy storage. Large scale energy storage has the potential to decrease the cost of energy because it would result in less waste and require less energy production. There are several ways of storing energy, such as with hydropower turbines and compressed air energy storage. Some power plants use lithium or sodium ion batteries to directly store electricity; however, these methods are costly.

As government regulations on brine disposal increase in the coming years, efforts to repurpose ROC are increasing as well. It is believed that repurposing ROC is an answer to a cost efficient energy storage system while recycling harmful wastewater.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Potential Repurposing of Reverse Osmosis Concentrate for Energy Storage Applications

HARBESON 49

Water desalination plants spend large amounts of money disposing wastewater because of environmental restrictions imposed by the government. Current options for disposing includes surface seawater discharge, sewer discharge, and deep well injections. Due to the high salinity of the wastewater it can cause a dramatic change in local ecosystems and add unwanted chemicals in any body of water. Deep well injections result in more earthquakes and can have a negative long term environmental impact.

Recently, there has been a push to find a way to repurpose the reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC). It has been used to grow bacteria in biology labs and for irrigation on salt-tolerant plants such as onions and certain grapevines. The ROC also contains metals and minerals that can be recovered up to 90% using ion flotation. The solute can be extracted from the reverse osmosis concentrate by evaporation. The solute contains various types of salts that can be used for road deicing and in the chemical industry. Other uses for the solute include cement manufacturing and road paving.

In this project, the ROC solute is looked at for a different repurposing effort. Currently, there has been a growing focus on grid-scale energy storage. Large scale energy storage has the potential to decrease the cost of energy because it would result in less waste and require less energy production. There are several ways of storing energy, such as with hydropower turbines and compressed air energy storage. Some power plants use lithium or sodium ion batteries to directly store electricity; however, these methods are costly.

As government regulations on brine disposal increase in the coming years, efforts to repurpose ROC are increasing as well. It is believed that repurposing ROC is an answer to a cost efficient energy storage system while recycling harmful wastewater.