Presentation Title

Pilot Testing of Upper Limb Robot Rehabilitation of Post-Stroke Patients using Mirror Therapy

Faculty Mentor

Nina Robson

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

HARBESON 53

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

This research describes the initial testing of the ARWED, which is a virtual reality system for physical rehabilitation of patients with reduced upper extremity mobility resulting from a stroke. The purpose of the ARWED is to increase limb Active Range of Motion. The system performs a symmetric reflection of the patients’ healthy limb into a virtual 3D photorealistic model and maps it in real time on to their most affected limb, tapping into the mirror neuron system and facilitating the initial learning phase. Using the developed system, pilot experiments tested the extension of the action-observation priming effect linked to the mirror-neuron system on healthy subjects and one post-stroke patient. The initial assessment of the developed virtual photorealistic 3D hand models with healthy subjects imply that the developed models prime the human motor system in a manner consistent with the human model.

The ARWED was tested on one post-stroke patient for the period of four weeks (one session/week). To assess the outcomes, the patient was tested on standard Box and Blocks and Fugl-Meyer tests prior and after the four-week ARWED therapy. Both tests are standard and assist in assessing the sensorimotor recovery after stroke. Movement time and Reaction time were measured through electromyography and 3D motion tracking system. The testing showed that people with reduced joint motions can react to computer animations, link those animations onto joint motions, and learn to move successfully with a constraint. The preliminary assessment of the ARWED revealed that overall there are no changes in the assessment scores with only 4 rounds of device training per patient. However, the pilot electromyography tests showed that the virtual reality mirror therapy could trigger muscle activation in patients that are more than 3 years post-stroke. This can further serve as evidence that the time needed for recovery from stroke is not limited to one year and that additional practice can improve mobility in both the sub-acute and chronic phases following a stroke. It was concluded that patients may benefit from increased frequency and duration of training with the device to assess for any changes in the assessment scores.

Summary of research results to be presented

. The preliminary assessment of the ARWED revealed that overall there are no changes in the assessment scores with only 4 rounds of device training per patient. However, the pilot electromyography tests showed that the virtual reality mirror therapy could trigger muscle activation in patients that are more than 3 years post-stroke. This can further serve as evidence that the time needed for recovery from stroke is not limited to one year and that additional practice can improve mobility in both the sub-acute and chronic phases following a stroke. It was concluded that patients may benefit from increased frequency and duration of training with the device to assess for any changes in the assessment scores.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Pilot Testing of Upper Limb Robot Rehabilitation of Post-Stroke Patients using Mirror Therapy

HARBESON 53

This research describes the initial testing of the ARWED, which is a virtual reality system for physical rehabilitation of patients with reduced upper extremity mobility resulting from a stroke. The purpose of the ARWED is to increase limb Active Range of Motion. The system performs a symmetric reflection of the patients’ healthy limb into a virtual 3D photorealistic model and maps it in real time on to their most affected limb, tapping into the mirror neuron system and facilitating the initial learning phase. Using the developed system, pilot experiments tested the extension of the action-observation priming effect linked to the mirror-neuron system on healthy subjects and one post-stroke patient. The initial assessment of the developed virtual photorealistic 3D hand models with healthy subjects imply that the developed models prime the human motor system in a manner consistent with the human model.

The ARWED was tested on one post-stroke patient for the period of four weeks (one session/week). To assess the outcomes, the patient was tested on standard Box and Blocks and Fugl-Meyer tests prior and after the four-week ARWED therapy. Both tests are standard and assist in assessing the sensorimotor recovery after stroke. Movement time and Reaction time were measured through electromyography and 3D motion tracking system. The testing showed that people with reduced joint motions can react to computer animations, link those animations onto joint motions, and learn to move successfully with a constraint. The preliminary assessment of the ARWED revealed that overall there are no changes in the assessment scores with only 4 rounds of device training per patient. However, the pilot electromyography tests showed that the virtual reality mirror therapy could trigger muscle activation in patients that are more than 3 years post-stroke. This can further serve as evidence that the time needed for recovery from stroke is not limited to one year and that additional practice can improve mobility in both the sub-acute and chronic phases following a stroke. It was concluded that patients may benefit from increased frequency and duration of training with the device to assess for any changes in the assessment scores.