Presentation Title

Optimization of Pretreatment Preceding Parallel Aerobic and Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors For Use in Decentralized Wastewater Treatment

Faculty Mentor

Natalie Mladenov, Eunha Hoh, Nathan Dodder

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

HARBESON 55

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

As the demand for water increases and its availability decreases, decentralized water reuse systems that implement membrane treatment could benefit locales in which centralized treatment systems may not be physically or economically feasible. In addition, they provide an alternative to replacing existing large-scale systems reaching the end of their design life. An expanding aspect of water quality research for membrane systems includes the presence, persistence, and transformation of potentially harmful chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) under aerobic or anaerobic treatment conditions. To simulate decentralized water reuse at the lab scale, we set up parallel treatment trains of aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems (MBR and AnMBR) and tested the efficiency of the pretreatment steps in our initial study. We utilized appropriate flow rates of 8-L/day for the aerobic side and 28.8-L/day for the anaerobic side to maintain the efficiency of the systems, aiming for a chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 60-80%. In addition to COD, we evaluated general water quality parameters, such as dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity, as well as total dissolved nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon concentration in the aerobic and anaerobic pretreatment steps. Optimization of pretreatment is crucial to subsequent operation of parallel MBR and AnMBR systems. The degradation, sorption, and persistence of CECs through the MBR and AnMBR will be studied to improve our understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of aerobic and anaerobic treatment at a decentralized level.

Summary of research results to be presented

The optimal pretreatment of the parallel aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems lies heavily in water quality analyses that include dissolved oxygen content, pH, turbidity, total dissolved nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon concentrations, in addition to chemical oxygen demand removal of the influent and effluent of both treatment trains.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Optimization of Pretreatment Preceding Parallel Aerobic and Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors For Use in Decentralized Wastewater Treatment

HARBESON 55

As the demand for water increases and its availability decreases, decentralized water reuse systems that implement membrane treatment could benefit locales in which centralized treatment systems may not be physically or economically feasible. In addition, they provide an alternative to replacing existing large-scale systems reaching the end of their design life. An expanding aspect of water quality research for membrane systems includes the presence, persistence, and transformation of potentially harmful chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) under aerobic or anaerobic treatment conditions. To simulate decentralized water reuse at the lab scale, we set up parallel treatment trains of aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems (MBR and AnMBR) and tested the efficiency of the pretreatment steps in our initial study. We utilized appropriate flow rates of 8-L/day for the aerobic side and 28.8-L/day for the anaerobic side to maintain the efficiency of the systems, aiming for a chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 60-80%. In addition to COD, we evaluated general water quality parameters, such as dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity, as well as total dissolved nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon concentration in the aerobic and anaerobic pretreatment steps. Optimization of pretreatment is crucial to subsequent operation of parallel MBR and AnMBR systems. The degradation, sorption, and persistence of CECs through the MBR and AnMBR will be studied to improve our understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of aerobic and anaerobic treatment at a decentralized level.