Presentation Title

Central Place Foraging: Delivery Lanes, Recruitment and Site Fidelity

Faculty Mentor

Jason Isaacs

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

HARBESON 17

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Central place foraging is a behavior in which many agents collect resources and return them to a central location. Central Place foraging has been observed in red-winged blackbirds and social insects such as ants and honeybees. Our system emulates this behavior using a multi-agent system of robots that can be used to collect resources in unknown environments. Many attributes of this multi-agent system, such as inter-agent congestion, inter-agent communication, and the use of memory can impact the efficiency of the system. This study seeks to evaluate the impact that each of these mechanisms play on central place foraging efficiency (rate of resource collection). To do so, we implemented three mechanisms; delivery lanes, site fidelity, and recruitment. Delivery lanes are claimable points around the central collection location meant to alleviate inter-agent congestion. If an agent has claimed a delivery lane then other agents avoid this area until the area claiming agent has left the area. Under site fidelity, the agent uses memory to return to the last known resource location before resuming its search after delivering a resource to the collection location. Lastly, recruitment uses inter-agent communication to alert other agents to assist with resource collection when resources are found. The behaviors were implemented with a finite state machine using a high-fidelity simulation environment built with ROS and Gazebo. Simulations were conducted using three robots across 26 randomly generated worlds while collecting data on the rate of resource collection. Our results showed that site fidelity had the largest effect on overall performance of the system. Recruitment had a positive but marginal effect while delivery lanes did not show an increase in overall performance.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Central Place Foraging: Delivery Lanes, Recruitment and Site Fidelity

HARBESON 17

Central place foraging is a behavior in which many agents collect resources and return them to a central location. Central Place foraging has been observed in red-winged blackbirds and social insects such as ants and honeybees. Our system emulates this behavior using a multi-agent system of robots that can be used to collect resources in unknown environments. Many attributes of this multi-agent system, such as inter-agent congestion, inter-agent communication, and the use of memory can impact the efficiency of the system. This study seeks to evaluate the impact that each of these mechanisms play on central place foraging efficiency (rate of resource collection). To do so, we implemented three mechanisms; delivery lanes, site fidelity, and recruitment. Delivery lanes are claimable points around the central collection location meant to alleviate inter-agent congestion. If an agent has claimed a delivery lane then other agents avoid this area until the area claiming agent has left the area. Under site fidelity, the agent uses memory to return to the last known resource location before resuming its search after delivering a resource to the collection location. Lastly, recruitment uses inter-agent communication to alert other agents to assist with resource collection when resources are found. The behaviors were implemented with a finite state machine using a high-fidelity simulation environment built with ROS and Gazebo. Simulations were conducted using three robots across 26 randomly generated worlds while collecting data on the rate of resource collection. Our results showed that site fidelity had the largest effect on overall performance of the system. Recruitment had a positive but marginal effect while delivery lanes did not show an increase in overall performance.