Presentation Title

Twin wire-arc spraying of steel coatings

Faculty Mentor

Nicole Wagner

Start Date

17-11-2018 9:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 9:45 AM

Location

C304

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Abstract

Twin wire-arc spraying has existed for almost a century, but not until the past couple decades has it become a relevant surface coating process. This thermal spraying technique, uses an electric arc to melt metallic wires. The molten droplets that are created are propelled by the high velocity carrier gas and impinge onto a substrate. The process has been used to fabricate industrial coatings or to fill cracks that have developed in a part. It is the desire to expand the applications and areas in which this spraying technique can be implemented. A way of achieving this is by understanding how the process conditions of twin wire-arc spraying affect the coating morphology and composition of the base and spray material. In this research, an Oerlikon Metco FlexiArc 300 twin-wire arc plasma spraying system was used with 1.6mm diameter steel wires to create coatings on carbon steel substrates. Process conditions, including power, standoff distance, and coating thickness were varied. The coating morphology was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to investigate the coating composition. Distinct light and dark regions were observed throughout the coating with variations in the composition of iron and oxygen between the regions. The morphology seen in SEM images indicated cracking throughout the laminae structures. In addition, coatings appeared delaminated from their substrates, with minimal adhesion. Both cracks and delamination of the coatings suggest stress build-up in the coating generated by the process.

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Nov 17th, 9:30 AM Nov 17th, 9:45 AM

Twin wire-arc spraying of steel coatings

C304

Abstract

Twin wire-arc spraying has existed for almost a century, but not until the past couple decades has it become a relevant surface coating process. This thermal spraying technique, uses an electric arc to melt metallic wires. The molten droplets that are created are propelled by the high velocity carrier gas and impinge onto a substrate. The process has been used to fabricate industrial coatings or to fill cracks that have developed in a part. It is the desire to expand the applications and areas in which this spraying technique can be implemented. A way of achieving this is by understanding how the process conditions of twin wire-arc spraying affect the coating morphology and composition of the base and spray material. In this research, an Oerlikon Metco FlexiArc 300 twin-wire arc plasma spraying system was used with 1.6mm diameter steel wires to create coatings on carbon steel substrates. Process conditions, including power, standoff distance, and coating thickness were varied. The coating morphology was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to investigate the coating composition. Distinct light and dark regions were observed throughout the coating with variations in the composition of iron and oxygen between the regions. The morphology seen in SEM images indicated cracking throughout the laminae structures. In addition, coatings appeared delaminated from their substrates, with minimal adhesion. Both cracks and delamination of the coatings suggest stress build-up in the coating generated by the process.