Presentation Title

Corrosion Studies of Metallic Foams

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Vilupanur A. Ravi

Start Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:45 AM

Location

C304

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Hydrogen gas is of great value in the chemical synthesis and metallurgical processing industries. More recently, there is a growing demand for hydrogen because of its usefulness in power generation using fuel cells. However, current practices for hydrogen production, such as steam-methane reforming, have a large carbon footprint and pose environmental challenges. A new approach to hydrogen production with potentially zero emissions is via water-splitting in a Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzer Cell (PEMEC). A critical issue in the PEMEC device is the choice of an appropriate material to function effectively as a liquid/gas diffusion layer (LGDL). Metallic foams offer an opportunity to address the needs for this application, i.e., permeability to both liquid and gas, good electrical and thermal conductivities, mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. Metallic foams are highly porous materials made through novel processing techniques. Aluminum foams were made available for corrosion tests. These foams offer advantages in regards to all of the properties with the notable exception of corrosion resistance. UNS Aluminum 6101 foams (UNS A96101) with relative densities of 4-6%, 6-8%, and 8-10% with varying pore densities of 10, 20, and 40 pores per inch were subjected to corrosion testing in this project. A total of 9 different materials was evaluated with 3 replicates for each type of material (27 tests in total). The corrosion behavior of test specimens made from these materials was evaluated by conducting tests in accordance with ASTM G59 standards. These measurements included open circuit potentials, linear polarization resistance and Tafel tests in aerated 0.01M sulfuric acid solution at 50⁰C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe localized changes on the surface of the UNS A96101. Foams with 20 PPI appear to be most noble among the materials studied.

Keywords: Metallic Foam, Corrosion, UNS A96101, ASTM G59, Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzer Cells

Summary of research results to be presented

The corrosion characteristics of UNS Aluminum 6101 foams (UNS A96101) with relative densities of 4-6%, 6-8%, and 8-10% and with varying pore densities of 10, 20, and 40 pores per inch were quantified by measuring open circuit potentials, linear polarization resistances, corrosion potentials and corrosion current densities. The results show that 20 PPI foams have the highest corrosion potential, an indication of nobility, as compared to 40 and 10 PPI foams. The relative density in the range from 4% to 10% did not show statistically significant differences for each pore density. The study of the corrosion resistance of metallic foams is in its infancy. We have conducted a comprehensive corrosion study using aluminum foams and have developed methods to understand the corrosion behavior of this unique form of materials. We will be extending this to other environments.

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Nov 17th, 10:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:45 AM

Corrosion Studies of Metallic Foams

C304

Hydrogen gas is of great value in the chemical synthesis and metallurgical processing industries. More recently, there is a growing demand for hydrogen because of its usefulness in power generation using fuel cells. However, current practices for hydrogen production, such as steam-methane reforming, have a large carbon footprint and pose environmental challenges. A new approach to hydrogen production with potentially zero emissions is via water-splitting in a Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzer Cell (PEMEC). A critical issue in the PEMEC device is the choice of an appropriate material to function effectively as a liquid/gas diffusion layer (LGDL). Metallic foams offer an opportunity to address the needs for this application, i.e., permeability to both liquid and gas, good electrical and thermal conductivities, mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. Metallic foams are highly porous materials made through novel processing techniques. Aluminum foams were made available for corrosion tests. These foams offer advantages in regards to all of the properties with the notable exception of corrosion resistance. UNS Aluminum 6101 foams (UNS A96101) with relative densities of 4-6%, 6-8%, and 8-10% with varying pore densities of 10, 20, and 40 pores per inch were subjected to corrosion testing in this project. A total of 9 different materials was evaluated with 3 replicates for each type of material (27 tests in total). The corrosion behavior of test specimens made from these materials was evaluated by conducting tests in accordance with ASTM G59 standards. These measurements included open circuit potentials, linear polarization resistance and Tafel tests in aerated 0.01M sulfuric acid solution at 50⁰C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe localized changes on the surface of the UNS A96101. Foams with 20 PPI appear to be most noble among the materials studied.

Keywords: Metallic Foam, Corrosion, UNS A96101, ASTM G59, Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzer Cells