Presentation Title

Can gas discharge plasma be used to modify Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene surfaces and improve acrylic bone cements bonding?

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Nina Abramzon

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:15 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

Location

C164

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

By 2030, the demand for primary total hip arthroplasties is estimated to grow by 174% to 572,000. The demand for primary total knee arthroplasties is projected to grow by 673% to 3.48 million procedures. Osteoarthritis can be debilitating and severely impact your quality of life, but can be significantly relieved through corrective arthroplasty surgeries. The common complications with total knee replacements specifically are a loosening/fracture of the device components (bone cement failure) as well as infection of the joint area. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used to couple metal-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic for total joint replacement (TJR) components due to its toughness, durability, and biological inertness. UHMWPE is adhered to bone with an acrylic bone cement, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Acrylic bone cements still play a key role in the anchorage of prostheses to the surrounding bone in cemented arthroplasties. Kurtz et al, has shown plasma treatment by means of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species on a surface changes the surface energy of materials. Our team will investigate plasma treatment adhesion effects of biomaterials to bone with PMMA, a commonly used acrylic bone cement. Through surface modification by means of oxygen and helium atmospheric plasma treatment, increasing the surface energy could prove for improved adherence of PMMA to biomaterials and reduce the risk of a factor of bone cement failure. In the gas discharge of plasma treatment, reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as NO, OH, and atomic oxygen are introduced. Treating the UHMWPE with ROS changes its surface properties and modifies them. The bond strength of treated and nontreated surfaces is to be measured by a tensile tester machine. We aim to assess how well PMMA adheres to UHMWP, how cold plasma treatment effects adhesion, and explore this effect on other arthroplasty biomaterials like nickel-titanium alloys in the future.

Summary of research results to be presented

Surface modification preliminary results showing variance of treatment time, relaxation time and exposure variation as a measure of contact angle variation.

As a function of treatment time of 1-5s, we are seeing an average of 24 Degrees in contact angle reduction. Control Average of ~67 degrees, treatment average of 43. These results are significant because we had further validated that contact angle variation in both settings was less than a 6 degree variation.

When assessing the relaxation time of 30 minutes, our control shows 79 degree angle average, a 41 degree initial treatment angle and a 65 degree angle after the relaxation period which is crucial to the potential time frame of wetability modification we would like to see.

These are our preliminary results before we move forward in the coming months with PMMA testing and fracture analysis.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 8:15 AM Nov 17th, 8:30 AM

Can gas discharge plasma be used to modify Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene surfaces and improve acrylic bone cements bonding?

C164

By 2030, the demand for primary total hip arthroplasties is estimated to grow by 174% to 572,000. The demand for primary total knee arthroplasties is projected to grow by 673% to 3.48 million procedures. Osteoarthritis can be debilitating and severely impact your quality of life, but can be significantly relieved through corrective arthroplasty surgeries. The common complications with total knee replacements specifically are a loosening/fracture of the device components (bone cement failure) as well as infection of the joint area. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used to couple metal-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic for total joint replacement (TJR) components due to its toughness, durability, and biological inertness. UHMWPE is adhered to bone with an acrylic bone cement, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Acrylic bone cements still play a key role in the anchorage of prostheses to the surrounding bone in cemented arthroplasties. Kurtz et al, has shown plasma treatment by means of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species on a surface changes the surface energy of materials. Our team will investigate plasma treatment adhesion effects of biomaterials to bone with PMMA, a commonly used acrylic bone cement. Through surface modification by means of oxygen and helium atmospheric plasma treatment, increasing the surface energy could prove for improved adherence of PMMA to biomaterials and reduce the risk of a factor of bone cement failure. In the gas discharge of plasma treatment, reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as NO, OH, and atomic oxygen are introduced. Treating the UHMWPE with ROS changes its surface properties and modifies them. The bond strength of treated and nontreated surfaces is to be measured by a tensile tester machine. We aim to assess how well PMMA adheres to UHMWP, how cold plasma treatment effects adhesion, and explore this effect on other arthroplasty biomaterials like nickel-titanium alloys in the future.