Presentation Title

Corrosion Testing of Titanium Alloys for Potential Dental Implant Applications

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Vilupanur Ravi, Chemical and Materials Engineering, Cal Poly Pomona

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:45 AM

Location

C164

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Titanium and titanium alloys are favorable candidates for biomedical implants due to their mechanical characteristics, biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. A widely used titanium alloy for dental implants is Ti-6Al-4V (mass %) due to its high tensile strength and low density. However, there are long-term issues with the use of Ti-6Al-4V as an implant material; The first is a phenomenon called stress shielding that is caused by the difference in the elastic moduli between the bone and the implant alloy, leading to bone degradation and subsequent loosening of the implant. Additionally, in vivo corrosion of Ti-6Al-4V releases aluminum cations, which has been linked to neurological disorders, and induces the accumulation of vanadium, a heavy metal that is toxic. Ni-Nb-Zr alloys, β-phase alloys, in particularly Ti-28Nb-20Zr (wt%), has sparked interest as another potential implant material due to its non-toxic constituents and lower elastic modulus. In this study, corrosion behaviors of Ti-28Nb-20Zr and Ti-39Nb-6Zr were compared to Ti-6Al-4V. Coupons were metallographically prepared to a 0.05 µm surface finish and underwent electrochemical tests in Fusayama/Meyer artificial saliva solution (7.1 pH). Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests in accordance to ASTM standard F2129-17 were run to determine the corrosion susceptibility of the implant alloy. Potentiodynamic polarization scans were conducted to determine corrosion resistance, corrosion potential and corrosion rate. The titanium alloy surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy.

Keywords: Electrochemistry, Biomedical, Titanium alloys, Dental

Summary of research results to be presented

Ti-28Nb-20Zr had the highest corrosion potential (-0.39 V vs. SCE) while Ti-6Al-4V had the highest polarization resistance (1.94 MΩ*cm^2) and lowest corrosion rate (11.46 mA/cm^2). In all cases, Ti-39Nb-6Zr had the worst performance. Overall the performance of the β-phase Ti-28Nb-20Zr and the Ti-6Al-4V were very similar, indicating that certain compositions of Ti-Nb-Zr alloys could serve as replacement of Ti-6Al-4V for the purpose of dental implant materials.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 8:45 AM

Corrosion Testing of Titanium Alloys for Potential Dental Implant Applications

C164

Titanium and titanium alloys are favorable candidates for biomedical implants due to their mechanical characteristics, biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. A widely used titanium alloy for dental implants is Ti-6Al-4V (mass %) due to its high tensile strength and low density. However, there are long-term issues with the use of Ti-6Al-4V as an implant material; The first is a phenomenon called stress shielding that is caused by the difference in the elastic moduli between the bone and the implant alloy, leading to bone degradation and subsequent loosening of the implant. Additionally, in vivo corrosion of Ti-6Al-4V releases aluminum cations, which has been linked to neurological disorders, and induces the accumulation of vanadium, a heavy metal that is toxic. Ni-Nb-Zr alloys, β-phase alloys, in particularly Ti-28Nb-20Zr (wt%), has sparked interest as another potential implant material due to its non-toxic constituents and lower elastic modulus. In this study, corrosion behaviors of Ti-28Nb-20Zr and Ti-39Nb-6Zr were compared to Ti-6Al-4V. Coupons were metallographically prepared to a 0.05 µm surface finish and underwent electrochemical tests in Fusayama/Meyer artificial saliva solution (7.1 pH). Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests in accordance to ASTM standard F2129-17 were run to determine the corrosion susceptibility of the implant alloy. Potentiodynamic polarization scans were conducted to determine corrosion resistance, corrosion potential and corrosion rate. The titanium alloy surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy.

Keywords: Electrochemistry, Biomedical, Titanium alloys, Dental