Presentation Title

High-spatial-resolution analysis of pollution near schools in socioeconomically disadvantaged Boyle Heights, Los Angeles

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Mariam Hartman

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 43

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Historically, Los Angeles County has struggled with high levels of pollution. To analyze the effects of pollution on a specific neighborhood, we used data from a collaboration between Google and Aclima, an environmental monitoring company, to map out the air pollution across California using Google Street View cars. The cars were equipped with air quality sensors and measured six pollutants: black carbon, PN2.5 (fine particulate matter that is 2.5 micrometers or smaller in diameter), nitrogen oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and methane. Three areas were mapped: the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, and California’s Central Valley. Unlike other pollution data, the dataset that we are using has an extremely high spatial resolution, allowing us to focus on smaller areas such as the regions near schools. Our research specifically looks at Boyle Heights, a neighborhood located on the east side of downtown Los Angeles. The neighborhood is in the middle of four major freeways (Interstates 5 and 10, US Highway 101, and State Route 60), socioeconomically disadvantaged and surrounded by industrial zones. We use the data to determine the levels of pollution near schools in Boyle Heights, and compare the data to other schools in Long Beach and West Hollywood. We hypothesize that the elementary schools, which are in the residential areas of Boyle Heights, are less likely to have high levels of each pollutant compared to the high schools in the neighborhood, which are closer to busy streets and freeways. Also, when comparing the levels of pollution to the schools in Long Beach and West Hollywood, the students in Boyle Heights are expected to have more exposure to pollutants, resulting in negative health impacts that could affect academic performance.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

High-spatial-resolution analysis of pollution near schools in socioeconomically disadvantaged Boyle Heights, Los Angeles

HARBESON 43

Historically, Los Angeles County has struggled with high levels of pollution. To analyze the effects of pollution on a specific neighborhood, we used data from a collaboration between Google and Aclima, an environmental monitoring company, to map out the air pollution across California using Google Street View cars. The cars were equipped with air quality sensors and measured six pollutants: black carbon, PN2.5 (fine particulate matter that is 2.5 micrometers or smaller in diameter), nitrogen oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and methane. Three areas were mapped: the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, and California’s Central Valley. Unlike other pollution data, the dataset that we are using has an extremely high spatial resolution, allowing us to focus on smaller areas such as the regions near schools. Our research specifically looks at Boyle Heights, a neighborhood located on the east side of downtown Los Angeles. The neighborhood is in the middle of four major freeways (Interstates 5 and 10, US Highway 101, and State Route 60), socioeconomically disadvantaged and surrounded by industrial zones. We use the data to determine the levels of pollution near schools in Boyle Heights, and compare the data to other schools in Long Beach and West Hollywood. We hypothesize that the elementary schools, which are in the residential areas of Boyle Heights, are less likely to have high levels of each pollutant compared to the high schools in the neighborhood, which are closer to busy streets and freeways. Also, when comparing the levels of pollution to the schools in Long Beach and West Hollywood, the students in Boyle Heights are expected to have more exposure to pollutants, resulting in negative health impacts that could affect academic performance.