Presentation Title

Ovarian Cancer Survival Trends and Racial Differences Using Registry Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program

Faculty Mentor

Alice Lee

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 46

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most fatal female gynecological malignancy, however, survival for women diagnosed with this disease is not the same. Studies have shown that African-Americans (AAs) have poorer survival than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), but there is limited literature on Hispanic whites (HWs) and Asian/Pacific Islanders (APIs). In addition, few studies have evaluated how ovarian cancer survival has changed over time for each race. Therefore, our project’s goal was to examine the five-year relative survival of NHWs, HWs, AAs, and APIs from 2000 to 2010.

METHODS: All data used in this project were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program database, which includes 18 population-based cancer registries in the United States. Only patients diagnosed with advanced-stage (i.e. distant stage) high-grade serous ovarian cancer from 2000 to 2010 were included in this analysis. Age-standardized five-year relative survival and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each racial group and by year to explore survival trends over time. A two-tailed Z-test was also calculated to compare the survival for HWs, AAs, and APIs to NHWs. All analyses were conducted using SEER*Stat software version 8.3.5.

RESULTS: A total of 14,462 ovarian cancer patients were identified. Survival improved for each racial group, however variability was noted in this improvement with a 19.05% increase for NHWs and only a 4.08% increase for AAs from 2000 to 2010. In addition, AAs overall had a significantly poorer survival than NHWs (28.83% versus 32.56%, p=0.006) while APIs had a significantly higher survival than NHWs (34.86% versus 32.56%, p=0.0004).

CONCLUSIONS: There are clear racial disparities when it comes to overall ovarian cancer survival and survival trends. These findings highlight race as an important ovarian cancer prognostic factor. Understanding the characteristics that describe each racial group may inform strategies for improving survival for this disease.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Ovarian Cancer Survival Trends and Racial Differences Using Registry Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program

HARBESON 46

BACKGROUND: Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most fatal female gynecological malignancy, however, survival for women diagnosed with this disease is not the same. Studies have shown that African-Americans (AAs) have poorer survival than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), but there is limited literature on Hispanic whites (HWs) and Asian/Pacific Islanders (APIs). In addition, few studies have evaluated how ovarian cancer survival has changed over time for each race. Therefore, our project’s goal was to examine the five-year relative survival of NHWs, HWs, AAs, and APIs from 2000 to 2010.

METHODS: All data used in this project were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program database, which includes 18 population-based cancer registries in the United States. Only patients diagnosed with advanced-stage (i.e. distant stage) high-grade serous ovarian cancer from 2000 to 2010 were included in this analysis. Age-standardized five-year relative survival and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each racial group and by year to explore survival trends over time. A two-tailed Z-test was also calculated to compare the survival for HWs, AAs, and APIs to NHWs. All analyses were conducted using SEER*Stat software version 8.3.5.

RESULTS: A total of 14,462 ovarian cancer patients were identified. Survival improved for each racial group, however variability was noted in this improvement with a 19.05% increase for NHWs and only a 4.08% increase for AAs from 2000 to 2010. In addition, AAs overall had a significantly poorer survival than NHWs (28.83% versus 32.56%, p=0.006) while APIs had a significantly higher survival than NHWs (34.86% versus 32.56%, p=0.0004).

CONCLUSIONS: There are clear racial disparities when it comes to overall ovarian cancer survival and survival trends. These findings highlight race as an important ovarian cancer prognostic factor. Understanding the characteristics that describe each racial group may inform strategies for improving survival for this disease.