Presentation Title

Development of a Mobile App to Investigate & Intervene Drivers at Risk for Driving Under the Influence of Drugs (DUID)

Faculty Mentor

Bharath Chakravarthy

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 48

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of a month of educational intervention administered through a mobile application to influence ED patients’ perceptions regarding driving under the influence of drugs. The study addresses two major trends: the increasing prevalence of drug related motor vehicle accidents and the limited public grasp of drug-related impairment when driving. The population will consist of patients from the UC Irvine Medical Center Emergency Department who are over the age of 18. The study will be looking specifically at drugs known to impair driving such as sleeping pills, anxiety pills, opioids/narcotics, and medicinal or recreational marijuana. These measurements will be recorded prior to and following the 4 week intervention to determine any change in perceptions that may occur.

The initial perceptions of each patient will be determined through an 18 question survey asking each patient to rank on a scale of one to five, their level of agreement with a provided statement regarding driving under the influence of drugs. Following this survey, each enrolled patient will be sent one notification containing relevant information pertaining to the dangers of driving under the influence of drugs via a mobile application daily for 28 days. To conclude, the same survey will be readministered at the end of 4 weeks and the responses and perceptions compared to those initially measured. Additionally, the app incorporates an anonymous networking feature allowing patients to communicate with one another as a means to discuss their thoughts and experiences. We hypothesize that the notifications alongside this networking feature will serve to educate patients on the dangers of driving under the influence of drugs and affect their perceptions in a similar manner. The study is currently in the data collection stage and enrolling patients, therefore no results have been found yet.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Development of a Mobile App to Investigate & Intervene Drivers at Risk for Driving Under the Influence of Drugs (DUID)

HARBESON 48

The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of a month of educational intervention administered through a mobile application to influence ED patients’ perceptions regarding driving under the influence of drugs. The study addresses two major trends: the increasing prevalence of drug related motor vehicle accidents and the limited public grasp of drug-related impairment when driving. The population will consist of patients from the UC Irvine Medical Center Emergency Department who are over the age of 18. The study will be looking specifically at drugs known to impair driving such as sleeping pills, anxiety pills, opioids/narcotics, and medicinal or recreational marijuana. These measurements will be recorded prior to and following the 4 week intervention to determine any change in perceptions that may occur.

The initial perceptions of each patient will be determined through an 18 question survey asking each patient to rank on a scale of one to five, their level of agreement with a provided statement regarding driving under the influence of drugs. Following this survey, each enrolled patient will be sent one notification containing relevant information pertaining to the dangers of driving under the influence of drugs via a mobile application daily for 28 days. To conclude, the same survey will be readministered at the end of 4 weeks and the responses and perceptions compared to those initially measured. Additionally, the app incorporates an anonymous networking feature allowing patients to communicate with one another as a means to discuss their thoughts and experiences. We hypothesize that the notifications alongside this networking feature will serve to educate patients on the dangers of driving under the influence of drugs and affect their perceptions in a similar manner. The study is currently in the data collection stage and enrolling patients, therefore no results have been found yet.