Presentation Title

Ovarian Cancer Incidence and Trends by Racial Group: A Preliminary Analysis of North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) Data

Faculty Mentor

Alice Lee

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 49

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Background: Ovarian cancer is the most fatal female gynecological cancer. Because risk varies across women, an understanding of its descriptive epidemiology is critical. Studies have shown that non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) have a higher incidence of ovarian cancer compared to other racial groups. However, there is less literature examining this by time trends and disease histology despite ovarian cancer’s heterogeneity.

Methods: We used data from 64 cancer registries in the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) database. NHW, Hispanic White (HW), Black, and Asian/Pacific Islander (API) epithelial ovarian cancer patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2015 were included. We considered the high-grade serous, low-grade serous, mucinous, endometrioid, and clear cell histologies. Age adjusted incidence rates (per 100,000) were calculated for each racial group and by histology. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated comparing HWs, Blacks, and APIs to NHWs. Lastly, annual percent changes (APCs) were used to quantify ovarian cancer incidence trends. All analyses were performed using SEER*Stat version 8.3.5.

Results: Across 310,224 ovarian cancer cases, NHWs had a statistically significantly higher incidence of all ovarian cancer histologies except clear cell; APIs were 1.48 times as likely to be diagnosed with clear cell ovarian cancer compared to NHWs (IRR=1.48, 95% CI 1.40-1.57). In addition, we observed a statistically significant decreasing trend in ovarian cancer incidence for all racial groups (all p<0.0001). However, the greatest decrease was among NHWs (APC=-1.91) whereas the smallest decrease was among APIs (APC=-0.89).

Conclusion: NHWs remain at significant increased risk of all ovarian cancer histologies when compared to other racial groups with the only exception being clear cell in which APIs are at the greatest risk. However, incidence rates for NHWs have decreased the most over time. Further research on potential risk factors is needed to better understand these racial disparities.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Ovarian Cancer Incidence and Trends by Racial Group: A Preliminary Analysis of North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) Data

HARBESON 49

Background: Ovarian cancer is the most fatal female gynecological cancer. Because risk varies across women, an understanding of its descriptive epidemiology is critical. Studies have shown that non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) have a higher incidence of ovarian cancer compared to other racial groups. However, there is less literature examining this by time trends and disease histology despite ovarian cancer’s heterogeneity.

Methods: We used data from 64 cancer registries in the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) database. NHW, Hispanic White (HW), Black, and Asian/Pacific Islander (API) epithelial ovarian cancer patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2015 were included. We considered the high-grade serous, low-grade serous, mucinous, endometrioid, and clear cell histologies. Age adjusted incidence rates (per 100,000) were calculated for each racial group and by histology. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated comparing HWs, Blacks, and APIs to NHWs. Lastly, annual percent changes (APCs) were used to quantify ovarian cancer incidence trends. All analyses were performed using SEER*Stat version 8.3.5.

Results: Across 310,224 ovarian cancer cases, NHWs had a statistically significantly higher incidence of all ovarian cancer histologies except clear cell; APIs were 1.48 times as likely to be diagnosed with clear cell ovarian cancer compared to NHWs (IRR=1.48, 95% CI 1.40-1.57). In addition, we observed a statistically significant decreasing trend in ovarian cancer incidence for all racial groups (all p<0.0001). However, the greatest decrease was among NHWs (APC=-1.91) whereas the smallest decrease was among APIs (APC=-0.89).

Conclusion: NHWs remain at significant increased risk of all ovarian cancer histologies when compared to other racial groups with the only exception being clear cell in which APIs are at the greatest risk. However, incidence rates for NHWs have decreased the most over time. Further research on potential risk factors is needed to better understand these racial disparities.