Presentation Title

Reduction in Blood Pressure in Salt-Sensitive Hypertensive Rats with Electroacupuncture and Aspirin

Faculty Mentor

Stephanie Tjen-A-Looi

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 33

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Hypertension is defined as blood pressure above 130 over 80 millimeters of mercury (mmHg). Stress, poor diets such as high salt, and innate genetic factors can all add to the risk of hypertension. Although hypertension medications, they can be costly, do not effectively control blood pressure, and may have adverse side effects. Thus, additional methods to lower high blood pressure should be investigated.

One possible method to reducing hypertension was studied in this investigation – electroacupuncture (abbreviated EA). EA utilizes a weak electrical current that connects to the acupuncture needles. This current stimulates the ST36 and ST37 acupoints and the deep peroneal nerve. EA reduces sympathoexcitation by modifying excited cardiovascular neurons; this causes a decrease in blood pressure. EA can decrease moderately high blood pressure (140-170/80-110 mmHg), but cannot reduce severe blood pressure. This study aimed to investigate other potential treatment that targets inhibition of the sympathetic system and inflammation.

The study tested the hypothesis that aspirin’s anti-inflammatory properties, combined with EA, reduce blood pressure in salt-sensitive rats with severe hypertension. To test this, salt-sensitive Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 13) were fed a 4% salt diet so that blood pressure would rapidly increase. Once their blood pressure was elevated over 160/90 mmHg, treatments began. The experimental group (n = 3) received EA and aspirin (2.5 mg/kg) to inhibit sympathetic activity and reduce inflammation. Multiple control groups were tested in comparison to EA and aspirin. These treatments utilized other techniques like saline injections (0.9% sodium chloride solution) and administration of sham-EA, which does not utilize electric current. Three control groups were tested: no treatment (n = 4), sham-EA and aspirin (n = 4), and EA and saline (n = 2). All groups were studied for four weeks; after these four weeks, the combination of EA and aspirin showed greater blood pressure reduction.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Reduction in Blood Pressure in Salt-Sensitive Hypertensive Rats with Electroacupuncture and Aspirin

HARBESON 33

Hypertension is defined as blood pressure above 130 over 80 millimeters of mercury (mmHg). Stress, poor diets such as high salt, and innate genetic factors can all add to the risk of hypertension. Although hypertension medications, they can be costly, do not effectively control blood pressure, and may have adverse side effects. Thus, additional methods to lower high blood pressure should be investigated.

One possible method to reducing hypertension was studied in this investigation – electroacupuncture (abbreviated EA). EA utilizes a weak electrical current that connects to the acupuncture needles. This current stimulates the ST36 and ST37 acupoints and the deep peroneal nerve. EA reduces sympathoexcitation by modifying excited cardiovascular neurons; this causes a decrease in blood pressure. EA can decrease moderately high blood pressure (140-170/80-110 mmHg), but cannot reduce severe blood pressure. This study aimed to investigate other potential treatment that targets inhibition of the sympathetic system and inflammation.

The study tested the hypothesis that aspirin’s anti-inflammatory properties, combined with EA, reduce blood pressure in salt-sensitive rats with severe hypertension. To test this, salt-sensitive Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 13) were fed a 4% salt diet so that blood pressure would rapidly increase. Once their blood pressure was elevated over 160/90 mmHg, treatments began. The experimental group (n = 3) received EA and aspirin (2.5 mg/kg) to inhibit sympathetic activity and reduce inflammation. Multiple control groups were tested in comparison to EA and aspirin. These treatments utilized other techniques like saline injections (0.9% sodium chloride solution) and administration of sham-EA, which does not utilize electric current. Three control groups were tested: no treatment (n = 4), sham-EA and aspirin (n = 4), and EA and saline (n = 2). All groups were studied for four weeks; after these four weeks, the combination of EA and aspirin showed greater blood pressure reduction.