Presentation Title

Postpartum Depression Screening in Minority Women

Faculty Mentor

LaSonya Davis

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 52

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Background: The physical and emotional changes in the postpartum period places mothers in a vulnerable position and at risk for postpartum depression (PPD). PPD is a mental illness requiring prompt intervention due to its high prevalence, its effect on maternal outcomes and on the development of their children. It is a condition that adversely affects minority women. Current literature reports, screening and proper follow up indicate a health disparity in these populations. According to the California Department of Public Health (2018), 15.4% of pregnant women in Ventura County were diagnosed with postpartum depression between 2013 and 2015.

Objectives: The objective of the retrospective chart review is to determine whether minority women, specifically Latino women, are being appropriately screened for Postpartum Depression (PPD) during both the perinatal and postpartum periods by care providers. We are identifying if screening is being performed using the recommended tools and if it is being done at the recommended times according to national guidelines by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

Method: The proposed study has received approval from the California State University Channel Islands Institutional Review Board. We will perform a randomized retrospective chart review with a sample size of 316 charts from a community clinic in Oxnard, California using a data collection tool. A coding system will be used to identify patient charts in order to maintain confidentiality. The quantitative research data analysis will be performed using descriptive statistics.

Results: Currently, we are in data collection process; chart-reviewing should be completed by October 30, 2018. We predict that most patients at this clinic are not being screened for PPD according to guidelines established by the ACOG. The study would assist us in identifying the prevalence of the problem in our patient population and subsequently stimulate quality improvement for enhanced patient care outcomes.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Postpartum Depression Screening in Minority Women

HARBESON 52

Background: The physical and emotional changes in the postpartum period places mothers in a vulnerable position and at risk for postpartum depression (PPD). PPD is a mental illness requiring prompt intervention due to its high prevalence, its effect on maternal outcomes and on the development of their children. It is a condition that adversely affects minority women. Current literature reports, screening and proper follow up indicate a health disparity in these populations. According to the California Department of Public Health (2018), 15.4% of pregnant women in Ventura County were diagnosed with postpartum depression between 2013 and 2015.

Objectives: The objective of the retrospective chart review is to determine whether minority women, specifically Latino women, are being appropriately screened for Postpartum Depression (PPD) during both the perinatal and postpartum periods by care providers. We are identifying if screening is being performed using the recommended tools and if it is being done at the recommended times according to national guidelines by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

Method: The proposed study has received approval from the California State University Channel Islands Institutional Review Board. We will perform a randomized retrospective chart review with a sample size of 316 charts from a community clinic in Oxnard, California using a data collection tool. A coding system will be used to identify patient charts in order to maintain confidentiality. The quantitative research data analysis will be performed using descriptive statistics.

Results: Currently, we are in data collection process; chart-reviewing should be completed by October 30, 2018. We predict that most patients at this clinic are not being screened for PPD according to guidelines established by the ACOG. The study would assist us in identifying the prevalence of the problem in our patient population and subsequently stimulate quality improvement for enhanced patient care outcomes.