Presentation Title

Repurposing Drugs Against Serratia liquefaciens

Faculty Mentor

Mikhail Martchenko

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 53

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Serratia infections are quickly becoming a growing problem as many strains of this bacteria are becoming resistant to the drugs used as the current course of treatment. This is a serious issue as 37% of patients who develop an infection from this genus die within 6 months. In order to expedite the drug discovery process, 1,586 FDA approved drugs were screened against Serratia liquefaciens in an effort to find a drug that could be repurposed as an antibacterial used to treat Serratia infections. Drugs were screened using both solid and liquid assays with tryptic soy broth (TSB) acting as the media. From the library, Drugs W, X, Y, and Z all appeared to be hits. However, it was only Drug W and Drug Y that showed true promise in their ability to kill S. liquefaciens. Although they both showed efficacy in solid and liquid assays as well as broad spectrum tests, this is just the first step and more research needs to be done in order to prove their efficacy.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Repurposing Drugs Against Serratia liquefaciens

HARBESON 53

Serratia infections are quickly becoming a growing problem as many strains of this bacteria are becoming resistant to the drugs used as the current course of treatment. This is a serious issue as 37% of patients who develop an infection from this genus die within 6 months. In order to expedite the drug discovery process, 1,586 FDA approved drugs were screened against Serratia liquefaciens in an effort to find a drug that could be repurposed as an antibacterial used to treat Serratia infections. Drugs were screened using both solid and liquid assays with tryptic soy broth (TSB) acting as the media. From the library, Drugs W, X, Y, and Z all appeared to be hits. However, it was only Drug W and Drug Y that showed true promise in their ability to kill S. liquefaciens. Although they both showed efficacy in solid and liquid assays as well as broad spectrum tests, this is just the first step and more research needs to be done in order to prove their efficacy.