Presentation Title

Effect of Smoking on Proteinuria in Hypertensive Patients

Faculty Mentor

Prabal K. Guha

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 55

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Renal function is adversely affected by many disease processes, like Hypertension, Diabetes, as well as various nephrotoxic agents. like nonsteroidals, chemotherapy drugs, aminoglycosides, etc. Mechanisms of renal injury vary. Diseases like Diabetes directly affect the glomerular basement membrane. Hypertension and several nephrotoxic agents can cause interstitial and tubular damage resulting in impaired renal function. Proteinuria, is an early phenomenon of most renal disease processes and can easily be identified in primary care setting using dipstick analysis. Nicotine is known to be a powerful vasoconstrictor, as evidenced by the fact that it significantly worsens vascular disease, and it potentially may be causing renal arteriolar vasoconstriction, thereby increasing intraglomerular pressure, and hence proteinuria. Another possible mechanism is that nicotine may cause direct endothelial damage, and hence proteinuria. Successive patients with hypertension seen within 2016-2018 who presented to a primary care physician’s office were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of smoking. The presence or absence of proteinuria was tested in both groups using a urine dipstick. Patients with pre-existing renal disease, pregnancy, known autoimmune diseases, current urinary tract infection, known vascular disease and age<18 were excluded from the study. 106 successive patients were evaluated and divided into 2 groups based on their smoking habit. 69% [36/52] of smokers had proteinuria as compared to 55% [30/54] of nonsmokers [p=0.073 calculated using 2 populations proportions z-test].

Though the study did not meet statistical significance, it shows a trend towards higher prevalence of proteinuria in hypertensives who are smokers.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Effect of Smoking on Proteinuria in Hypertensive Patients

HARBESON 55

Renal function is adversely affected by many disease processes, like Hypertension, Diabetes, as well as various nephrotoxic agents. like nonsteroidals, chemotherapy drugs, aminoglycosides, etc. Mechanisms of renal injury vary. Diseases like Diabetes directly affect the glomerular basement membrane. Hypertension and several nephrotoxic agents can cause interstitial and tubular damage resulting in impaired renal function. Proteinuria, is an early phenomenon of most renal disease processes and can easily be identified in primary care setting using dipstick analysis. Nicotine is known to be a powerful vasoconstrictor, as evidenced by the fact that it significantly worsens vascular disease, and it potentially may be causing renal arteriolar vasoconstriction, thereby increasing intraglomerular pressure, and hence proteinuria. Another possible mechanism is that nicotine may cause direct endothelial damage, and hence proteinuria. Successive patients with hypertension seen within 2016-2018 who presented to a primary care physician’s office were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of smoking. The presence or absence of proteinuria was tested in both groups using a urine dipstick. Patients with pre-existing renal disease, pregnancy, known autoimmune diseases, current urinary tract infection, known vascular disease and age<18 were excluded from the study. 106 successive patients were evaluated and divided into 2 groups based on their smoking habit.>69% [36/52] of smokers had proteinuria as compared to 55% [30/54] of nonsmokers [p=0.073 calculated using 2 populations proportions z-test].

Though the study did not meet statistical significance, it shows a trend towards higher prevalence of proteinuria in hypertensives who are smokers.