Presentation Title

Hepatitis C in the Southern California Vietnamese American Community

Faculty Mentor

Alice Lee

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 57

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important public health issue that affects 175 million people and accounts for 25% of liver cancers worldwide. Its prevalence in the United States is 1.8%, but among Asian Americans, it is as high as 6.0%, with Vietnamese Americans (VAs) constituting most of all HCV cases. Despite this unequal burden of HCV risk, there is minimal research being done specifically in VAs. Therefore, our project’s goal is to identify factors associated with HCV risk in the VA community. We used serological and self-reported questionnaire data from hepatitis screening community events in Orange County and Los Angeles County organized by the Vietnamese American Cancer Foundation in 2012. Those who had a positive HCV antibody blood test were considered infected with HCV whereas those who tested negative were considered at risk. We used logistic regression to quantify the association between various factors and risk of HCV using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Out of 388 VA participants, 4.9% were positively infected with HCV. Age was the most striking risk factor; those 65 years or older were 4.66 times more likely to have HCV compared to those younger than 50 years (OR=5.66, 95% CI=1.49-21.44). Other notable, but non-significant, subgroups at increased risk included males as well as those of a lower socioeconomic status, as indicated by their income and their access to health services. Overall, our findings shed light on the epidemiology of HCV in the VA community. Public health efforts addressing HCV in the subgroups we identified at increased risk are needed.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Hepatitis C in the Southern California Vietnamese American Community

HARBESON 57

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important public health issue that affects 175 million people and accounts for 25% of liver cancers worldwide. Its prevalence in the United States is 1.8%, but among Asian Americans, it is as high as 6.0%, with Vietnamese Americans (VAs) constituting most of all HCV cases. Despite this unequal burden of HCV risk, there is minimal research being done specifically in VAs. Therefore, our project’s goal is to identify factors associated with HCV risk in the VA community. We used serological and self-reported questionnaire data from hepatitis screening community events in Orange County and Los Angeles County organized by the Vietnamese American Cancer Foundation in 2012. Those who had a positive HCV antibody blood test were considered infected with HCV whereas those who tested negative were considered at risk. We used logistic regression to quantify the association between various factors and risk of HCV using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Out of 388 VA participants, 4.9% were positively infected with HCV. Age was the most striking risk factor; those 65 years or older were 4.66 times more likely to have HCV compared to those younger than 50 years (OR=5.66, 95% CI=1.49-21.44). Other notable, but non-significant, subgroups at increased risk included males as well as those of a lower socioeconomic status, as indicated by their income and their access to health services. Overall, our findings shed light on the epidemiology of HCV in the VA community. Public health efforts addressing HCV in the subgroups we identified at increased risk are needed.