Presentation Title

Outcomes of Patients with Early Stage Breast Cancer Treated with Lumpectomy Followed by Whole Breast Radiation (WBI) vs. Accelerated Partial Breast Radiation (APBI)

Faculty Mentor

Ly Do, Morteza Dowlatshahi, Erica Fradinger

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 58

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

The current standard of treatment for early stage breast cancer patients involves lumpectomy followed by whole breast irradiation (WBI). However, for appropriately selected patients, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has become an alternative to whole breast irradiation. The objective of this study was to compare the local control, survival rate, distant metastasis recurrence, and cosmesis of partial breast irradiation versus whole breast irradiation in appropriately selected early stage breast cancer patients. Between 08/2006 and 05/2018, 183 patients (age 42-95) with early stage (DCIS, T1, and T2) breast cancer, with size equal to or less than 3 cm, negative margins, ductal histology, no lymphovascular space invasion, and no involved axillary nodes were treated with lumpectomy and sentinel node biopsy followed by either WBI or APBI using either a single lumen or multi lumen catheter. 73 patients were treated with APBI, and 110 patients were treated with WBI. The local control, local regional control, distant metastasis recurrence, survival rate, and cosmesis results were determined from the Kaplan-Meier method. The overall cosmesis was determined from the Harvard breast cosmesis scale. Patients who underwent APBI treatment had 100% local control rate. Patients treated with WBI also had 100% local control rate as well, with no local regional failure in the cohort. On the harvard breast cosmesis scale, all (73/73) patients treated with APBI achieved excellent/good cosmesis, while (107/110) patients undergoing WBI had excellent/good cosmesis, (3/110) achieved fair cosmesis scores. Cancer specific survival was 100% for both APBI and WBI patients. In our cohort of patients, our results suggest that APBI may be a feasible alternative to WBI in appropriately selected early stage breast cancer patients with similar outcomes and excellent cosmesis. Further randomized phase III studies such as the NSABP B-39 will help to validate our findings.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Outcomes of Patients with Early Stage Breast Cancer Treated with Lumpectomy Followed by Whole Breast Radiation (WBI) vs. Accelerated Partial Breast Radiation (APBI)

HARBESON 58

The current standard of treatment for early stage breast cancer patients involves lumpectomy followed by whole breast irradiation (WBI). However, for appropriately selected patients, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has become an alternative to whole breast irradiation. The objective of this study was to compare the local control, survival rate, distant metastasis recurrence, and cosmesis of partial breast irradiation versus whole breast irradiation in appropriately selected early stage breast cancer patients. Between 08/2006 and 05/2018, 183 patients (age 42-95) with early stage (DCIS, T1, and T2) breast cancer, with size equal to or less than 3 cm, negative margins, ductal histology, no lymphovascular space invasion, and no involved axillary nodes were treated with lumpectomy and sentinel node biopsy followed by either WBI or APBI using either a single lumen or multi lumen catheter. 73 patients were treated with APBI, and 110 patients were treated with WBI. The local control, local regional control, distant metastasis recurrence, survival rate, and cosmesis results were determined from the Kaplan-Meier method. The overall cosmesis was determined from the Harvard breast cosmesis scale. Patients who underwent APBI treatment had 100% local control rate. Patients treated with WBI also had 100% local control rate as well, with no local regional failure in the cohort. On the harvard breast cosmesis scale, all (73/73) patients treated with APBI achieved excellent/good cosmesis, while (107/110) patients undergoing WBI had excellent/good cosmesis, (3/110) achieved fair cosmesis scores. Cancer specific survival was 100% for both APBI and WBI patients. In our cohort of patients, our results suggest that APBI may be a feasible alternative to WBI in appropriately selected early stage breast cancer patients with similar outcomes and excellent cosmesis. Further randomized phase III studies such as the NSABP B-39 will help to validate our findings.