Presentation Title

Resources and Physical Activity on Infants' Motor Development

Faculty Mentor

Do Kyeong Lee

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 59

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Infants with limited access to resources are at risk for developmental delays in language, attention, information processing, inhibitory control, and emotion regulation. However, little is known about whether access to resources affects infant locomotor development. In our previous studies, we found that infants with more resources had earlier onsets for locomotor milestones. We also found that despite these earlier onsets, there were no significant differences between the rate of improvement or proficiency levels for locomotion. Because of this, another study is being conducted to look at the infant’s amount of experience to determine if this is a factor helping the low-resource infants have a similar locomotor proficiency level.

In total, 129 infants ages 10,13, 15, and 19 months were observed over time. The infants were categorized into a high (82 infants) or low-resource group (47 infants). Infants with greater access to resources were predominantly European-American while infants with less access were Latino immigrants. The high-resource group had higher SES scores (Hollingshead Index), higher parental education level, less crowding within the home, and more opportunities for physical activities outside the home compared with infants in the low-resource group. There was a very little overlap of resources when comparing the high and low resource groups. Parent’s years of education was the strongest factor in determining the later onset age in low-resource infants.

To determine the infant’s practice time walking, we observed infants playing for 20 minutes in a controlled environment, looking at physical activity level defined by walking. Throughout the 20 minutes, we calculated the amount of practice walking the infants had by looking at the onset and offset of every step.

Based on preliminary data, our results are still inconclusive. Because of this, we will be looking at spontaneous movement prior to when infants achieve the walking skill.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Resources and Physical Activity on Infants' Motor Development

HARBESON 59

Infants with limited access to resources are at risk for developmental delays in language, attention, information processing, inhibitory control, and emotion regulation. However, little is known about whether access to resources affects infant locomotor development. In our previous studies, we found that infants with more resources had earlier onsets for locomotor milestones. We also found that despite these earlier onsets, there were no significant differences between the rate of improvement or proficiency levels for locomotion. Because of this, another study is being conducted to look at the infant’s amount of experience to determine if this is a factor helping the low-resource infants have a similar locomotor proficiency level.

In total, 129 infants ages 10,13, 15, and 19 months were observed over time. The infants were categorized into a high (82 infants) or low-resource group (47 infants). Infants with greater access to resources were predominantly European-American while infants with less access were Latino immigrants. The high-resource group had higher SES scores (Hollingshead Index), higher parental education level, less crowding within the home, and more opportunities for physical activities outside the home compared with infants in the low-resource group. There was a very little overlap of resources when comparing the high and low resource groups. Parent’s years of education was the strongest factor in determining the later onset age in low-resource infants.

To determine the infant’s practice time walking, we observed infants playing for 20 minutes in a controlled environment, looking at physical activity level defined by walking. Throughout the 20 minutes, we calculated the amount of practice walking the infants had by looking at the onset and offset of every step.

Based on preliminary data, our results are still inconclusive. Because of this, we will be looking at spontaneous movement prior to when infants achieve the walking skill.