Presentation Title

Gender Differences in Episodic Memory Through the Stimulation of Olfaction

Faculty Mentor

Erica Fradinger

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 40

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

The significance of this study was to analyze episodic memory through olfactory stimulation, test for potential differences among genders, and discover what memory model was best represented by our data. For our procedure, we had our subjects blindfolded to eradicate other senses such as touch and sight. Each subject smelled fifteen universal scents that were numerically labeled to trigger their recollection of events from their past experiences, that correlated to their explicit memory. Three questions were then asked to help the subjects remember a specific memory associated with each scent. Our results collectively indicated no statistical difference between male and female averages with respect to smell. Also, the memory model, Levels of Processing, best represented our results considering olfaction requires deep semantic processing. The data showed a positive correlation between positive scent feedbacks and scent induced memory recollection. A negative correlation was shown between negative scent feedback and scent induced memory recollection. These correlations indicated that if a subject favors a scent, he/she is more likely to not have an induced memory recollection versus a subject who dislike a scent is more likely to not have a scent-induced memory formation.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Gender Differences in Episodic Memory Through the Stimulation of Olfaction

HARBESON 40

The significance of this study was to analyze episodic memory through olfactory stimulation, test for potential differences among genders, and discover what memory model was best represented by our data. For our procedure, we had our subjects blindfolded to eradicate other senses such as touch and sight. Each subject smelled fifteen universal scents that were numerically labeled to trigger their recollection of events from their past experiences, that correlated to their explicit memory. Three questions were then asked to help the subjects remember a specific memory associated with each scent. Our results collectively indicated no statistical difference between male and female averages with respect to smell. Also, the memory model, Levels of Processing, best represented our results considering olfaction requires deep semantic processing. The data showed a positive correlation between positive scent feedbacks and scent induced memory recollection. A negative correlation was shown between negative scent feedback and scent induced memory recollection. These correlations indicated that if a subject favors a scent, he/she is more likely to not have an induced memory recollection versus a subject who dislike a scent is more likely to not have a scent-induced memory formation.