Presentation Title

Assessing Associations Between Liver Ultrasonography and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in the Emergency Department

Faculty Mentor

Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont, MD, MS, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of California, Irvine

Start Date

17-11-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

C304

Session

Oral 3

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Excessive alcohol consumption is a risk factor for alcoholic liver disease (ALD) which may range from fatty liver disease, hepatitis to cirrhosis. The gold standard test to diagnose the severity is a liver biopsy. However, ultrasonography has also been widely used as a non-invasive alternative. The World Health Organization developed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), a self-report survey, to efficiently identify patients at-risk for hazardous alcohol consumption. The efficacy of AUDIT in identifying alcohol-related liver morphological changes has yet to be compared. Thus, we aim to assess associations between AUDIT scores and liver ultrasonographic findings in adult emergency department (ED) patients. We conducted a prospective study from June 2018 to September 2018 at a university-based, level-one trauma ED. A preliminary sample of 10 patients was consented to participate in the study. Each patient privately completed the AUDIT on a secured tablet. Subsequently, research associates performed a liver ultrasound on the patient, capturing images of the patient’s liver, spleen, and kidneys. Afterwards, a certified diagnostic radiologist graded the ultrasound images on liver echogenicity, parenchymal texture and surface. Both the research associates and radiologist were blinded from the AUDIT scores when obtaining and interpreting the ultrasonographic results, respectively. Descriptive statistics and ANOVA were used for data analysis. The preliminary data suggests that moderate steatosis is associated with higher audit scores; however, the sample size is too small to reach statistical significance. We plan to continue enrolling patients and gain a larger sample size to find significance between AUDIT scores and liver health via ultrasonography.

Keywords: ultrasound, liver health, AUDIT, alcohol screening, emergency department

Summary of research results to be presented

The average AUDIT score was 11.30 (95% Confidence Interval: 1.13-21.29). For liver echogenicity, the mean AUDIT scores for normal findings, mild steatosis and moderate steatosis were 10, 5 and 38, respectively. No statistical differences between groups were found. Majority of this cohort (90%) had normal liver parenchyma and surface. Therefore, we cannot perform the statistical analysis for both parameters.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 2:15 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Assessing Associations Between Liver Ultrasonography and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in the Emergency Department

C304

Excessive alcohol consumption is a risk factor for alcoholic liver disease (ALD) which may range from fatty liver disease, hepatitis to cirrhosis. The gold standard test to diagnose the severity is a liver biopsy. However, ultrasonography has also been widely used as a non-invasive alternative. The World Health Organization developed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), a self-report survey, to efficiently identify patients at-risk for hazardous alcohol consumption. The efficacy of AUDIT in identifying alcohol-related liver morphological changes has yet to be compared. Thus, we aim to assess associations between AUDIT scores and liver ultrasonographic findings in adult emergency department (ED) patients. We conducted a prospective study from June 2018 to September 2018 at a university-based, level-one trauma ED. A preliminary sample of 10 patients was consented to participate in the study. Each patient privately completed the AUDIT on a secured tablet. Subsequently, research associates performed a liver ultrasound on the patient, capturing images of the patient’s liver, spleen, and kidneys. Afterwards, a certified diagnostic radiologist graded the ultrasound images on liver echogenicity, parenchymal texture and surface. Both the research associates and radiologist were blinded from the AUDIT scores when obtaining and interpreting the ultrasonographic results, respectively. Descriptive statistics and ANOVA were used for data analysis. The preliminary data suggests that moderate steatosis is associated with higher audit scores; however, the sample size is too small to reach statistical significance. We plan to continue enrolling patients and gain a larger sample size to find significance between AUDIT scores and liver health via ultrasonography.

Keywords: ultrasound, liver health, AUDIT, alcohol screening, emergency department