Presentation Title

UNDERREPORTING OF ALCOHOL USE IN TRAUMA PATIENTS: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

Faculty Mentor

Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:15 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

Location

C304

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Background: We assessed the inconsistencies between self-reported alcohol consumption and blood alcohol content (BAC) in trauma patients. We aimed to identify the incidence and characteristics of trauma patients who reported a zero score on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), yet yielded a positive BAC; thereby providing us the ability to conduct alcohol screening and healthcare to these at-risk alcohol consumers.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study from 2010-2018 at a university-based, level-one trauma emergency department. We identified 2,581 adult trauma patients who reported a zero score on the AUDIT from the trauma registry. We collected BAC, age, gender, race, education level, mechanism of injury, language and injury severity score (ISS) from patient charts, and used descriptive analyses and multivariate logistic regression to analyze the data.

Results: 5.08% of trauma patients who reported AUDIT of zero had a positive BAC. We found that being male (OR 1.53), assaulted or injured from a penetrating mechanism (OR 2.29) and having an ISS greater than 25 (OR 3.76) were independent positive predictors of trauma patients who reported an AUDIT of zero and had a positive BAC. While age (OR 0.99) was an independent negative predictor.

Conclusions: Inaccurate self-reporting of alcohol drinking behavior does exist in trauma patients. A composite of objective alcohol screening modalities, in addition to AUDIT, is needed to screen for alcohol use in this population. Healthcare providers should remain highly suspicious of alcohol-related injuries in individuals with the identified characteristics.

Summary of research results to be presented

A total of 2,581 trauma patients reported an AUDIT score of zero over the eight-year period of this study. Of these patients, 5.08% had a positive BAC. Furthermore, 2.75% of the patients had a BAC > 80 mg/dL. In our logistic regression test, we found that being male (OR 1.53), assaulted or injured from a penetrating mechanism (OR 2.29) and having an ISS greater than 25 (OR 3.76) were independent positive predictors of trauma patients who reported an AUDIT of zero and had a positive BAC. Age (OR 0.99) was an independent negative predictor. Factors that were not significant include race, language of screening, and education level.

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Nov 17th, 8:15 AM Nov 17th, 8:30 AM

UNDERREPORTING OF ALCOHOL USE IN TRAUMA PATIENTS: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

C304

Background: We assessed the inconsistencies between self-reported alcohol consumption and blood alcohol content (BAC) in trauma patients. We aimed to identify the incidence and characteristics of trauma patients who reported a zero score on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), yet yielded a positive BAC; thereby providing us the ability to conduct alcohol screening and healthcare to these at-risk alcohol consumers.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study from 2010-2018 at a university-based, level-one trauma emergency department. We identified 2,581 adult trauma patients who reported a zero score on the AUDIT from the trauma registry. We collected BAC, age, gender, race, education level, mechanism of injury, language and injury severity score (ISS) from patient charts, and used descriptive analyses and multivariate logistic regression to analyze the data.

Results: 5.08% of trauma patients who reported AUDIT of zero had a positive BAC. We found that being male (OR 1.53), assaulted or injured from a penetrating mechanism (OR 2.29) and having an ISS greater than 25 (OR 3.76) were independent positive predictors of trauma patients who reported an AUDIT of zero and had a positive BAC. While age (OR 0.99) was an independent negative predictor.

Conclusions: Inaccurate self-reporting of alcohol drinking behavior does exist in trauma patients. A composite of objective alcohol screening modalities, in addition to AUDIT, is needed to screen for alcohol use in this population. Healthcare providers should remain highly suspicious of alcohol-related injuries in individuals with the identified characteristics.