Presentation Title

Risk of Distraction In Trauma

Faculty Mentor

Cristobal Barrios, Jr., MD, FACS

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:45 AM

Location

C304

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

There is a direct correlation that exists between distracted travel and increased risk of safety while driving. Every year, about 421,000 people are injured as a result of a driver who was distracted in some way. 330,000 of these accidents are caused by texting and driving and have lead to severe injuries. Distracted pedestrians have also been found to raise the risk of pedestrian related accidents. Specifically, nearly 4 out of 10 Americans say they have witnessed a distracted walking incident and just over a quarter of them admit to being part of an incident themselves. We hypothesize that there is distraction across all roles in trauma. This was a continuous prospective study with a 10 question survey administered to all trauma patients at a Level 1 Trauma Center. This analyzed age, gender, ethnicity, level of education, mode of injury, role they played in their accident, and any form of distraction involved. The method of distraction elicited was the driver, passenger, pedestrian, bicyclist, or motorcyclist. Our data suggests that distraction in trauma can involve all mechanisms, roles, gender, ethnicities, and levels of education. For future studies, more specific analysis is required to target higher risk modes of distraction depending on the method of transportation and populations with the same overall goal of improving public safety.

KEYWORDS: distraction, trauma, patient survey, public safety, transportation

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 8:45 AM

Risk of Distraction In Trauma

C304

There is a direct correlation that exists between distracted travel and increased risk of safety while driving. Every year, about 421,000 people are injured as a result of a driver who was distracted in some way. 330,000 of these accidents are caused by texting and driving and have lead to severe injuries. Distracted pedestrians have also been found to raise the risk of pedestrian related accidents. Specifically, nearly 4 out of 10 Americans say they have witnessed a distracted walking incident and just over a quarter of them admit to being part of an incident themselves. We hypothesize that there is distraction across all roles in trauma. This was a continuous prospective study with a 10 question survey administered to all trauma patients at a Level 1 Trauma Center. This analyzed age, gender, ethnicity, level of education, mode of injury, role they played in their accident, and any form of distraction involved. The method of distraction elicited was the driver, passenger, pedestrian, bicyclist, or motorcyclist. Our data suggests that distraction in trauma can involve all mechanisms, roles, gender, ethnicities, and levels of education. For future studies, more specific analysis is required to target higher risk modes of distraction depending on the method of transportation and populations with the same overall goal of improving public safety.

KEYWORDS: distraction, trauma, patient survey, public safety, transportation