Presentation Title

Gender Equality

Faculty Mentor

Alyssa Samek

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 92

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

Crystal Eastman’s speech “Now We Can Begin,” delivered in 1920, addressed the issue of civil liberties among women during the early 20th century. At the time of this speech, Eastman participated in the women’s rights movement as part of the National Woman’s Party and wrote for The Liberator on work accidents and women’s rights. Eastman demonstrated to her fellow suffragists that women had a voice to advocate for justice. As a suffragist, she helped initiate the start towards freedom among women when the 19th amendment was passed and ratified by Congress in August 18, 1920, that granted women the right to vote. In this essay, I argue that Eastman used leader and teacher as her personas and a passionate tone to persuade her audience of suffragists that fought for their freedom and independence to encourage gender equality. I first outline Eastman’s educational achievements, as well as her role with the women’s movement. Then continue to analyze why she became so fond of the idea for women to gain more civil rights through the workplace and in society. I also offer a further glimpse into the women’s suffrage movement. I discuss the legacy of “Now We Can Begin” with civil rights and specify the influence of encouraging discussion on equal rights to increase awareness about the women’s movement. Crystal Eastman became a part of the National Hall of Fame at Seneca Falls in 2000, giving her honors for being one of the many activists for women's rights. Furthermore, these findings emphasized her impact on advances in gender equality including the Equal Pay Act.

Keywords: equality, women’s suffrage, freedom, civil liberties

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Gender Equality

CREVELING 92

Crystal Eastman’s speech “Now We Can Begin,” delivered in 1920, addressed the issue of civil liberties among women during the early 20th century. At the time of this speech, Eastman participated in the women’s rights movement as part of the National Woman’s Party and wrote for The Liberator on work accidents and women’s rights. Eastman demonstrated to her fellow suffragists that women had a voice to advocate for justice. As a suffragist, she helped initiate the start towards freedom among women when the 19th amendment was passed and ratified by Congress in August 18, 1920, that granted women the right to vote. In this essay, I argue that Eastman used leader and teacher as her personas and a passionate tone to persuade her audience of suffragists that fought for their freedom and independence to encourage gender equality. I first outline Eastman’s educational achievements, as well as her role with the women’s movement. Then continue to analyze why she became so fond of the idea for women to gain more civil rights through the workplace and in society. I also offer a further glimpse into the women’s suffrage movement. I discuss the legacy of “Now We Can Begin” with civil rights and specify the influence of encouraging discussion on equal rights to increase awareness about the women’s movement. Crystal Eastman became a part of the National Hall of Fame at Seneca Falls in 2000, giving her honors for being one of the many activists for women's rights. Furthermore, these findings emphasized her impact on advances in gender equality including the Equal Pay Act.

Keywords: equality, women’s suffrage, freedom, civil liberties