Presentation Title

The Polish Presence in Jamestown

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Michaela Reaves

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 93

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

During the seventeenth century, imperial attitudes for the British favored expansion into the new world. The Virginia Company, comprised of two smaller Joint stock companies: the London Company and Plymouth Company, made its way to the Eastern seaboard of the soon to be British colonies. Allotted roughly one hundred miles of land, the London Stock Company built its first outpost 14 May 1607, named Jamestown after King James I. The fort became the first permanent English settlement in the new world. Captain John Smith became the leader of the new colony. Using a variety of primary sources from Captain John Smith’s own writings to records from the Library of Congress it can be determined that this might have never been the case without the assistance of the Polish settlers who arrived in 1608. Jamestown flourished due to the handiwork, craftsmanship, ingenuity, economic benefit, and enfranchisement of the Polish settlers who were drafted by the Virginia Company to save the colony before it collapsed.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

The Polish Presence in Jamestown

CREVELING 93

During the seventeenth century, imperial attitudes for the British favored expansion into the new world. The Virginia Company, comprised of two smaller Joint stock companies: the London Company and Plymouth Company, made its way to the Eastern seaboard of the soon to be British colonies. Allotted roughly one hundred miles of land, the London Stock Company built its first outpost 14 May 1607, named Jamestown after King James I. The fort became the first permanent English settlement in the new world. Captain John Smith became the leader of the new colony. Using a variety of primary sources from Captain John Smith’s own writings to records from the Library of Congress it can be determined that this might have never been the case without the assistance of the Polish settlers who arrived in 1608. Jamestown flourished due to the handiwork, craftsmanship, ingenuity, economic benefit, and enfranchisement of the Polish settlers who were drafted by the Virginia Company to save the colony before it collapsed.