Presentation Title

Golden Age Female Mystery Authors and their Adoption of Oppressive Language

Faculty Mentor

Ryan Murphy

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 88

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

The early to mid-1900s in Britain saw a Golden Age of Crime Fiction as female authors broke into the mystery genre and redefined the image of who could become a successful writer. Most notably, three women whose names continue to conjure suspenseful mysteries are Margery Allingham, Agatha Christie, and Dorothy L. Sayers; each woman contributed her voice to claim a space for women within both the literary and social world. This research initially focused on the oppressive and patriarchal language each woman used within her works, as this language came to odds with the progressive idea of female authors. Discovered through this research was the revelation that these three women came from backgrounds of higher status and saw some loss of this privilege in their lifetimes, whether it was due to mental illness, a decline in wealth, or foreigners moving into Britain. The Golden Age of Crime Fiction saw Allingham’s, Christie’s, and Sayers’ reactions to these shifting social spheres were to adopt the language of their own oppressors—wealthy, white men—and utilize it themselves to reobtain their privilege.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Golden Age Female Mystery Authors and their Adoption of Oppressive Language

CREVELING 88

The early to mid-1900s in Britain saw a Golden Age of Crime Fiction as female authors broke into the mystery genre and redefined the image of who could become a successful writer. Most notably, three women whose names continue to conjure suspenseful mysteries are Margery Allingham, Agatha Christie, and Dorothy L. Sayers; each woman contributed her voice to claim a space for women within both the literary and social world. This research initially focused on the oppressive and patriarchal language each woman used within her works, as this language came to odds with the progressive idea of female authors. Discovered through this research was the revelation that these three women came from backgrounds of higher status and saw some loss of this privilege in their lifetimes, whether it was due to mental illness, a decline in wealth, or foreigners moving into Britain. The Golden Age of Crime Fiction saw Allingham’s, Christie’s, and Sayers’ reactions to these shifting social spheres were to adopt the language of their own oppressors—wealthy, white men—and utilize it themselves to reobtain their privilege.