Presentation Title

Hands of Law: Who Gets to Kill in Legitimate Way or Who Becomes Outlaw

Presenter Information

Mohsen AlamFollow

Faculty Mentor

Douglas Mullane

Start Date

17-11-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 5:00 PM

Location

CREVELING 91

Session

POSTER 3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

Alan Moore’s Watchmen uses reference of the Keene Act of 1977 that bans the super- vigilante activities. This paper intends to discuss the legality of this law by analyzing its background and execution. The public demand of outlawing all of the super-vigilante activities functions as the basement of this law. However, this act does not outlaw all of them, and it also gives the government a chance to hire some of them. By doing so, this law violates the moral position that derived from the public support. Tony Spanakos’ ‘Super-Vigilantes and the Keene Act’ reviews the relations between different super-vigilantes and the Keene Act, which is used as a reference for this discussion. While this law declares Rorschach as a fugitive, it employs the Comedian as a muscleman and uses Dr. Manhattan as a tool. This apparent distinction of behavior towards different super-vigilantes reveals the inequality in execution. This study on the Keene Act of 1977 is important in today’s world because the process of investigating a law by investigating its execution can be implemented in the real world as well. By investigating the legality of a fictional law, one can perceive the justification of the laws that she or he abides by. Though the action, vigilante activities, might have a chance of being wrong, the banning of that action requires a stronger moral support, which the Keene Act lacks.

Summary of research results to be presented

The Keene Act of 1977 does not have the legitimacy to outlaw the super-vigilante activities, because this law lacks a strong moral position that differentiates between the lawful and unlawful activities as the law itself opens the door to use the super-vigilante powers whenever the state needs them.

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Nov 17th, 3:00 PM Nov 17th, 5:00 PM

Hands of Law: Who Gets to Kill in Legitimate Way or Who Becomes Outlaw

CREVELING 91

Alan Moore’s Watchmen uses reference of the Keene Act of 1977 that bans the super- vigilante activities. This paper intends to discuss the legality of this law by analyzing its background and execution. The public demand of outlawing all of the super-vigilante activities functions as the basement of this law. However, this act does not outlaw all of them, and it also gives the government a chance to hire some of them. By doing so, this law violates the moral position that derived from the public support. Tony Spanakos’ ‘Super-Vigilantes and the Keene Act’ reviews the relations between different super-vigilantes and the Keene Act, which is used as a reference for this discussion. While this law declares Rorschach as a fugitive, it employs the Comedian as a muscleman and uses Dr. Manhattan as a tool. This apparent distinction of behavior towards different super-vigilantes reveals the inequality in execution. This study on the Keene Act of 1977 is important in today’s world because the process of investigating a law by investigating its execution can be implemented in the real world as well. By investigating the legality of a fictional law, one can perceive the justification of the laws that she or he abides by. Though the action, vigilante activities, might have a chance of being wrong, the banning of that action requires a stronger moral support, which the Keene Act lacks.