Presentation Title

Pinpointing Change: A Comparative Look at American & Mexican Immigration Policy from the 1990s-Now

Faculty Mentor

Jose Orozco

Start Date

17-11-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:15 AM

Location

C308

Session

Oral 2

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

The US southern border is a key part of debate and conversation in America today. The border spans 1954 miles and linking the US to a country that is relied on heavily, Mexico. This border is shared by two countries, but the decisions surrounding the divide have been primarily made by one country, the United States. America forced the border to cross many native Mexicans in 1848 and have been dictating the policies that surround the divide ever since then. Has the US been able to assert their influence beyond there southern border with Mexico and push for their policies to be enforced further south?

This research is focused on the relationship between the United States and Mexico, with an emphasis on United States influence on Mexico’s southern border with Guatemala and Belize. It specifically will focus on the impact of UNited States influence on Mexico’s southern border enforcement and policy. My research is driven by the recent offer of $20 million dollars by the United States to Mexico, this money is supposed to be used for Mexico to enforce their immigration policy and deportation along their southern border. Has the United States always tried to pay their way into Mexican immigration policy or is this a new concept? Tracing the two counties relationship starting in the 1990s with Operation Gatekeeper, moving to the 2000s with the Mérida Initiative, then to present day with the Trump administration and their relationship to Mexico, my research aims to uncover if the United States has been pushing Mexico for their own agenda or if Mexico has been creating and enforcing policy through their own needs.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 10:15 AM

Pinpointing Change: A Comparative Look at American & Mexican Immigration Policy from the 1990s-Now

C308

The US southern border is a key part of debate and conversation in America today. The border spans 1954 miles and linking the US to a country that is relied on heavily, Mexico. This border is shared by two countries, but the decisions surrounding the divide have been primarily made by one country, the United States. America forced the border to cross many native Mexicans in 1848 and have been dictating the policies that surround the divide ever since then. Has the US been able to assert their influence beyond there southern border with Mexico and push for their policies to be enforced further south?

This research is focused on the relationship between the United States and Mexico, with an emphasis on United States influence on Mexico’s southern border with Guatemala and Belize. It specifically will focus on the impact of UNited States influence on Mexico’s southern border enforcement and policy. My research is driven by the recent offer of $20 million dollars by the United States to Mexico, this money is supposed to be used for Mexico to enforce their immigration policy and deportation along their southern border. Has the United States always tried to pay their way into Mexican immigration policy or is this a new concept? Tracing the two counties relationship starting in the 1990s with Operation Gatekeeper, moving to the 2000s with the Mérida Initiative, then to present day with the Trump administration and their relationship to Mexico, my research aims to uncover if the United States has been pushing Mexico for their own agenda or if Mexico has been creating and enforcing policy through their own needs.