Presentation Title

"Children, Religion, and Agency in Jacqueline Woodson's Brown Girl Dreaming"

Presenter Information

Kenia RodriguezFollow

Faculty Mentor

Krystal Jo Howard

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:15 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

Location

C308

Session

Oral 1

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

In her verse memoir, Brown Girl Dreaming, Jacqueline Woodon presents many of the challenges that she experienced with different aspects of religion during her childhood. From being forced by her grandmother to be a Jehovah's Witness to wondering about the Mecca with her Muslim uncle, Robert, Jacqueline is exposed to various forms of religion. Learning that she does not completely agree with the practices of her forced faith, Jacqueline begins to question some religious beliefs. I argue that Woodson's depiction of internal uncertainty towards her forced faith leads her to develop her own system of beliefs and reveals the relationship between childhood, religion, and agency.

Summary of research results to be presented

My findings indicate that Woodson depicts the relationship between childhood, religion, and agency through her use of a child narrator that demonstrates agency through uncertainty about her forced religion. Woodson portrays the power of questioning established teachings as a means for developing one's own system of beliefs. Through her realization that religion is much more complex than she is conditioned to believe, Woodson presents her childhood relationship with religion as one that develops through critical thinking and self agency.

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Nov 17th, 8:15 AM Nov 17th, 8:30 AM

"Children, Religion, and Agency in Jacqueline Woodson's Brown Girl Dreaming"

C308

In her verse memoir, Brown Girl Dreaming, Jacqueline Woodon presents many of the challenges that she experienced with different aspects of religion during her childhood. From being forced by her grandmother to be a Jehovah's Witness to wondering about the Mecca with her Muslim uncle, Robert, Jacqueline is exposed to various forms of religion. Learning that she does not completely agree with the practices of her forced faith, Jacqueline begins to question some religious beliefs. I argue that Woodson's depiction of internal uncertainty towards her forced faith leads her to develop her own system of beliefs and reveals the relationship between childhood, religion, and agency.