Presentation Title

Companion Planting: Dill and Peas in the Southern California Mediterranean Climate

Presenter Information

sophia airaFollow

Faculty Mentor

Erika Catanese Sotela

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 1

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Abstract:

Permaculture and traditionalist farmers champion companion planting for their ability to ward off pests, increase their yield and promote soil health over time. However, little research has been done to substantiate such practices. The practice of monoculture makes plants extremely vulnerable to disease and infestation which leads farmers to rely heavily on the use of pesticides. The purpose of this research is to determine if dill (Anethum graveolens) and peas (Pisum sativum) will make good companion plants in the Mediterranean climate of Los Angeles. The experiment will consist of 2 sets of 30 pea plants. The plants in the first set are growing in pots of their own. In the second group, the pea plants are sharing their container with dill plants. At the start of the experiment, the plants were all cut to the same length of 6inches. I predict that at the close of this experiment, the second set of plants will have grown to be healthier and more robust due to the increased soil activity.

Keywords: permaculture, traditional farming, companion planting

Supporting research:

1. Ehrmann, Jürgen, and Karl Ritz. “Plant: Soil Interactions in Temperate Multi-Cropping Production Systems.” Plant and Soil, vol. 376, no. 1/2, 2014, pp. 1–29., www.jstor.org/stable/42953095.

2.Ladwig-Cooper, Stephanie. “Companion Planting Information and Chart.” The Permaculture Research Institute, 4 Nov. 2016, permaculturenews.org/2011/12/02/companion-planting-information-and-chart/.

Summary of research results to be presented

Images and measurements of specimens taken at intervals over the course of the experiment.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Companion Planting: Dill and Peas in the Southern California Mediterranean Climate

CREVELING 1

Abstract:

Permaculture and traditionalist farmers champion companion planting for their ability to ward off pests, increase their yield and promote soil health over time. However, little research has been done to substantiate such practices. The practice of monoculture makes plants extremely vulnerable to disease and infestation which leads farmers to rely heavily on the use of pesticides. The purpose of this research is to determine if dill (Anethum graveolens) and peas (Pisum sativum) will make good companion plants in the Mediterranean climate of Los Angeles. The experiment will consist of 2 sets of 30 pea plants. The plants in the first set are growing in pots of their own. In the second group, the pea plants are sharing their container with dill plants. At the start of the experiment, the plants were all cut to the same length of 6inches. I predict that at the close of this experiment, the second set of plants will have grown to be healthier and more robust due to the increased soil activity.

Keywords: permaculture, traditional farming, companion planting

Supporting research:

1. Ehrmann, Jürgen, and Karl Ritz. “Plant: Soil Interactions in Temperate Multi-Cropping Production Systems.” Plant and Soil, vol. 376, no. 1/2, 2014, pp. 1–29., www.jstor.org/stable/42953095.

2.Ladwig-Cooper, Stephanie. “Companion Planting Information and Chart.” The Permaculture Research Institute, 4 Nov. 2016, permaculturenews.org/2011/12/02/companion-planting-information-and-chart/.