Presentation Title

The Role of Metabolism of Plant Cell-wall Components in the Sinorhizobium meliloti/Alfalfa Symbiosis

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Daniel Wacks

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 107

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Sinorhizobium meliloti is a soil bacterium that establishes a symbiotic relationship with alfalfa. In this symbiotic relationship, the bacteria convert N2 into ammonium, a process known as nitrogen fixation. The bacteria gain nutrients and shelter and plants are given a nitrogen source. Nitrogen fixation takes place in nodules that are formed when the bacteria infect the plant root. During the process of nodulation, the bacteria grow in different environments, such as the rhizosphere and decaying nodules, where they may be able to use plant cell-wall components as carbon sources. We have strains of S. meliloti altered to grow on galacturonic acid, a potential breakdown product of pectin, strains derived from these that fail to grow on galacturonic acid, and other strains that grow very slowly or not at all on cellobiose, a potential breakdown product of cellulose. We hypothesized that these alterations in metabolism could affect nodulation. We studied the rate and extent of nodulation by strains altered in growth on galacturonic acid or cellobiose. These alterations in metabolism made no clear difference in nodulation by the different strains.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

The Role of Metabolism of Plant Cell-wall Components in the Sinorhizobium meliloti/Alfalfa Symbiosis

CREVELING 107

Sinorhizobium meliloti is a soil bacterium that establishes a symbiotic relationship with alfalfa. In this symbiotic relationship, the bacteria convert N2 into ammonium, a process known as nitrogen fixation. The bacteria gain nutrients and shelter and plants are given a nitrogen source. Nitrogen fixation takes place in nodules that are formed when the bacteria infect the plant root. During the process of nodulation, the bacteria grow in different environments, such as the rhizosphere and decaying nodules, where they may be able to use plant cell-wall components as carbon sources. We have strains of S. meliloti altered to grow on galacturonic acid, a potential breakdown product of pectin, strains derived from these that fail to grow on galacturonic acid, and other strains that grow very slowly or not at all on cellobiose, a potential breakdown product of cellulose. We hypothesized that these alterations in metabolism could affect nodulation. We studied the rate and extent of nodulation by strains altered in growth on galacturonic acid or cellobiose. These alterations in metabolism made no clear difference in nodulation by the different strains.