Presentation Title

Effect of Salt on a Domesticated Grass: An Indication for Growth of Plants

Faculty Mentor

Erika Catanese

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 81

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Presenter: William Tong and Nick Preston

Mentors: Professor Cantanese

Title: Effect of Salt on a Domesticated Grass: An Indication for Growth of Plants

Plant soil contains a multitude of different compounds and one such compound, sodium chloride, also known as NaCl, has been thoroughly researched to understand how plants are able to survive in different concentrations of salt. NaCl behaves as a stressor to plants which causes the plant to adjust accordingly to survive in a new environment (Amira 7-8). Each plant species varies in their tolerance in different salt affected soils. Too much or too little salt can be detrimental to the growth of the plant as it can lead to a lack of proper balance of nutrients for plants to survive. Plants have been able to adapt by decreasing their water consumption, increasing their days to wilting, change their water use efficiency, and limiting their organic matter production (Glenn 10). In this experiment, 15 samples of Zoysia japonica grass has been exposed to 0.844 M of NaCl solution and another 15 samples of Zoysia japonica grass has been exposed to plain water. The experiment is currently being conducted and results will be posted by the time of the conference. Researching the effect of salts can help combat the global scarcity of water and to devise different techniques such as utilizing diluted ocean water to help facilitate agricultural production around the world.

Work Cited Page

Amira M.S., Abdul Qados. “Effect of Salt Stress on Plant Growth and Metabolism on Bean Plant Vicia faba.” Journal of the Saudi Society of Agricultural Sciences, vol. 10, issue 1, 2011, pp 7-15. ScienceDirect, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1658077X10000032.

Glenn, Edward P., and J. Jed Brown. “Effects of Soil Salt Levels on the Growth and Water Use Efficiency of Atriplex Canescens (Chenopodiaceae) Varieties in Drying Soil.” American Journal of Botany, vol. 85, no. 1, 1998, pp. 10–16. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2446548.

Phleger, Charles F. “Effect of Salinity on Growth of a Salt Marsh Grass.” Ecology, vol. 52, no. 5, 1971, pp. 908–911. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/1936042.

Rudolfs, Willem. “Influence of Salt upon Growth Rate of Asparagus.” Botanical Gazette, vol. 83, no. 1, 1927, pp. 94–98. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2470495.

Shrivastava, Pooja, and Rajesh Kumar. “Soil Salinity: A Serious Environmental Issue and Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria as One of the Tools for Its Alleviation.” Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences 22.2 (2015): 123–131. PMC. Web. 4 Oct. 2018.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Effect of Salt on a Domesticated Grass: An Indication for Growth of Plants

CREVELING 81

Presenter: William Tong and Nick Preston

Mentors: Professor Cantanese

Title: Effect of Salt on a Domesticated Grass: An Indication for Growth of Plants

Plant soil contains a multitude of different compounds and one such compound, sodium chloride, also known as NaCl, has been thoroughly researched to understand how plants are able to survive in different concentrations of salt. NaCl behaves as a stressor to plants which causes the plant to adjust accordingly to survive in a new environment (Amira 7-8). Each plant species varies in their tolerance in different salt affected soils. Too much or too little salt can be detrimental to the growth of the plant as it can lead to a lack of proper balance of nutrients for plants to survive. Plants have been able to adapt by decreasing their water consumption, increasing their days to wilting, change their water use efficiency, and limiting their organic matter production (Glenn 10). In this experiment, 15 samples of Zoysia japonica grass has been exposed to 0.844 M of NaCl solution and another 15 samples of Zoysia japonica grass has been exposed to plain water. The experiment is currently being conducted and results will be posted by the time of the conference. Researching the effect of salts can help combat the global scarcity of water and to devise different techniques such as utilizing diluted ocean water to help facilitate agricultural production around the world.

Work Cited Page

Amira M.S., Abdul Qados. “Effect of Salt Stress on Plant Growth and Metabolism on Bean Plant Vicia faba.” Journal of the Saudi Society of Agricultural Sciences, vol. 10, issue 1, 2011, pp 7-15. ScienceDirect, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1658077X10000032.

Glenn, Edward P., and J. Jed Brown. “Effects of Soil Salt Levels on the Growth and Water Use Efficiency of Atriplex Canescens (Chenopodiaceae) Varieties in Drying Soil.” American Journal of Botany, vol. 85, no. 1, 1998, pp. 10–16. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2446548.

Phleger, Charles F. “Effect of Salinity on Growth of a Salt Marsh Grass.” Ecology, vol. 52, no. 5, 1971, pp. 908–911. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/1936042.

Rudolfs, Willem. “Influence of Salt upon Growth Rate of Asparagus.” Botanical Gazette, vol. 83, no. 1, 1927, pp. 94–98. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2470495.

Shrivastava, Pooja, and Rajesh Kumar. “Soil Salinity: A Serious Environmental Issue and Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria as One of the Tools for Its Alleviation.” Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences 22.2 (2015): 123–131. PMC. Web. 4 Oct. 2018.