Presentation Title

Plant Maze — Will the plant find its way?

Presenter Information

Julia VasquezFollow

Faculty Mentor

Erika Catanese

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 82

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Plant Maze — Will the plant find its way?

Start Date

29 Sep 2018

End Date

On going

Abstract

It is well known that plants need light to survive, so what happens when you only allow light to reach the plant through a limited space? When studying phototropism, it’s found that plants are more likely to follow strong rays of light than to grow straight up. They move with the light so they can absorb as much light as possible.(Liscum) To create the maze I used a basic shoe box, potting soil, duct tape and Glycine Max seedlings. Trapping the seedling in this box with limited light forces them to grow around the obstacles towards the light. My plant hasn't quiet sprouted from its bean but I have been able to observe some embryonic shoots. Too my surprise the shoots have already supported my hypothesis. The shoots are growing in the direction of the light. Phototropism is an amazing trait for plant survival and it will be interesting to see what the results will show at the time the conference is held.

Source

Emmanuel Liscum, Scott K. Askinosie, Daniel L. Leuchtman, Johanna Morrow, Kyle T. Willenburg, Diana Roberts Coats The Plant Cell Jan 2014, 26 (1) 38-55; DOI: 10.1105/tpc.113.119727

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Plant Maze — Will the plant find its way?

CREVELING 82

Plant Maze — Will the plant find its way?

Start Date

29 Sep 2018

End Date

On going

Abstract

It is well known that plants need light to survive, so what happens when you only allow light to reach the plant through a limited space? When studying phototropism, it’s found that plants are more likely to follow strong rays of light than to grow straight up. They move with the light so they can absorb as much light as possible.(Liscum) To create the maze I used a basic shoe box, potting soil, duct tape and Glycine Max seedlings. Trapping the seedling in this box with limited light forces them to grow around the obstacles towards the light. My plant hasn't quiet sprouted from its bean but I have been able to observe some embryonic shoots. Too my surprise the shoots have already supported my hypothesis. The shoots are growing in the direction of the light. Phototropism is an amazing trait for plant survival and it will be interesting to see what the results will show at the time the conference is held.

Source

Emmanuel Liscum, Scott K. Askinosie, Daniel L. Leuchtman, Johanna Morrow, Kyle T. Willenburg, Diana Roberts Coats The Plant Cell Jan 2014, 26 (1) 38-55; DOI: 10.1105/tpc.113.119727