Presentation Title

Altering Circadian Clock Cycles to Enhance Plant Defense

Presenter Information

Tara CastellanoFollow

Faculty Mentor

Professor Erika Catanese Sotela

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 85

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Plants have been forced to succumb to aggressive and fast spreading invasive species (What Plants Talk About, 2014).This has resulted in detrimental circumstances for crops in which invasive species attack necessary native plants used to supply nutrition for animals and nutrients to land. Perhaps, under circadian control, we can establish a night and day defense against the rapid spreading of invasive species. Furthermore, by conducting experiments involving the exposure of artificial sunlight on a section of the native species during their nocturnal cycles we can increase defensive strengths prior to attack for example, there is evidence that circadian control of jasmonates and salicylates in plants (crucial in defensive behavior) can be altered (Goodspeed et al, 2012). Additionally, (Trewavas, 2003), found plant signal transduction influencing plant behavior, which I believe, in an ongoing experiment, can be used in the exchange of nutrients and energy amongst each other in order to avoid an invasive species take over. In order to make sure plant growth retains its strength throughout its growth cycle, artificial sunlight has been exposed on two sets of phaseolus vulgaris on alternating circadian schedules. While this is an ongoing experiment, the results will be completed with statistical analysis by the time of the conference.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Altering Circadian Clock Cycles to Enhance Plant Defense

CREVELING 85

Plants have been forced to succumb to aggressive and fast spreading invasive species (What Plants Talk About, 2014).This has resulted in detrimental circumstances for crops in which invasive species attack necessary native plants used to supply nutrition for animals and nutrients to land. Perhaps, under circadian control, we can establish a night and day defense against the rapid spreading of invasive species. Furthermore, by conducting experiments involving the exposure of artificial sunlight on a section of the native species during their nocturnal cycles we can increase defensive strengths prior to attack for example, there is evidence that circadian control of jasmonates and salicylates in plants (crucial in defensive behavior) can be altered (Goodspeed et al, 2012). Additionally, (Trewavas, 2003), found plant signal transduction influencing plant behavior, which I believe, in an ongoing experiment, can be used in the exchange of nutrients and energy amongst each other in order to avoid an invasive species take over. In order to make sure plant growth retains its strength throughout its growth cycle, artificial sunlight has been exposed on two sets of phaseolus vulgaris on alternating circadian schedules. While this is an ongoing experiment, the results will be completed with statistical analysis by the time of the conference.