Presentation Title

Cytotoxic effects of phytochemical ajoene on adherent and non-adherent cancers

Faculty Mentor

Sylvia Vetrone

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 88

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Garlic is a common ingredient with a long history of human use both as a food and a medicine. When garlic is processed, allicin molecules are released and a chemical reaction occurs forming ajoene, an organosulfur compound. Previous studies have shown ajoene to have anti-cancerous properties such as inhibiting cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis, and reducing adhesion in solid tumor cancer cells. Based on these previous findings, we hypothesize that treating non-adherent (leukemia and myeloma: Jurkat, RPMI 8226, and CML) and adherent (prostate and breast: LNCAP and MCF7) cancer cell lines with ajoene will result in lower viability due to increased apoptosis induced by the compound. In this study, these cells were plated and exposed to varying concentrations of ajoene ranging from 20 to 120 μM and assessed for viability, cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Our findings indicate that cell viability was statistically reduced in a dose responsive manner in all non-adherent cell lines when exposed at the lower concentrations of 20 to 80 μM ajoene exposure, while the adherent cell lines required a higher exposure of 120 μM. These results are very promising and suggest that ajoene’s cytotoxic effect is more potent in non-adherent cells compared to adherent cells. Current studies are being performed to determine the type of cell death occurring as a result of the cells’ exposure to ajoene, as well as what cellular mechanisms are being triggered as a result of the exposure.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Cytotoxic effects of phytochemical ajoene on adherent and non-adherent cancers

CREVELING 88

Garlic is a common ingredient with a long history of human use both as a food and a medicine. When garlic is processed, allicin molecules are released and a chemical reaction occurs forming ajoene, an organosulfur compound. Previous studies have shown ajoene to have anti-cancerous properties such as inhibiting cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis, and reducing adhesion in solid tumor cancer cells. Based on these previous findings, we hypothesize that treating non-adherent (leukemia and myeloma: Jurkat, RPMI 8226, and CML) and adherent (prostate and breast: LNCAP and MCF7) cancer cell lines with ajoene will result in lower viability due to increased apoptosis induced by the compound. In this study, these cells were plated and exposed to varying concentrations of ajoene ranging from 20 to 120 μM and assessed for viability, cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Our findings indicate that cell viability was statistically reduced in a dose responsive manner in all non-adherent cell lines when exposed at the lower concentrations of 20 to 80 μM ajoene exposure, while the adherent cell lines required a higher exposure of 120 μM. These results are very promising and suggest that ajoene’s cytotoxic effect is more potent in non-adherent cells compared to adherent cells. Current studies are being performed to determine the type of cell death occurring as a result of the cells’ exposure to ajoene, as well as what cellular mechanisms are being triggered as a result of the exposure.