Presentation Title

Investigating the effect of Cannabidiol on Cancer Cells

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Sylvia Vetrone

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 9

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Cannabis, although commonly associated with its use as a psychoactive drug, also has been shown to alleviate pain and disease symptoms. In particular, Cannabidiol (CBD), a constitute of Cannabis, has demonstrated numerous benefits such as acting as an anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, and antioxidant. Studies exploring the benefits of CBD in cancer have shown its ability to trigger the induction of ER stress and inhibition of AKT and mTOR signaling in breast cancer cells, and the upregulation of Beclin 1 triggering apoptosis in melanoma. Taken together these studies suggest that CBD’s cytotoxic and anti-proliferative properties may be suitable as a treatment for cancer, and we hypothesized that CBD would also be able to induce apoptosis other cancer models in a dose-response manner. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effect of CBD on viability and cytotoxicity in two tumor forming cell lines, prostate cancer (LNCap) and breast cancer (MCF-7). Briefly, we exposed LNCap and MCF7 cell lines to various concentrations of cannabidiol (5 ug, 10 ug, 15 ug, and 20 ug) over three days, and assessed its effects using three viability and cytotoxicity assays. Our results show the CBD was successful in statistically reducing viability (p=0.02) by 75% in both cell lines at all concentrations tested when exposed to the CBD as early as 48 hours. Additionally, an apoptosis assay demonstrated that CBD was able to induce apoptosis in the LNCap cell line (p=0.01), but not in MCF7, which was statistically lower for apoptosis (p=0.01) compared to the control, implying that CBD might be triggering death through either anoikis or necrosis for MCF7. As these findings lend to the increasing evidence of CBD as a potential viable, alternative, and less harmful treatment option against prostate and breast cancer, our current efforts are focusing on determining the which death pathways (apoptosis, anoikis, necrosis) are triggered by CBD exposure.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Investigating the effect of Cannabidiol on Cancer Cells

CREVELING 9

Cannabis, although commonly associated with its use as a psychoactive drug, also has been shown to alleviate pain and disease symptoms. In particular, Cannabidiol (CBD), a constitute of Cannabis, has demonstrated numerous benefits such as acting as an anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, and antioxidant. Studies exploring the benefits of CBD in cancer have shown its ability to trigger the induction of ER stress and inhibition of AKT and mTOR signaling in breast cancer cells, and the upregulation of Beclin 1 triggering apoptosis in melanoma. Taken together these studies suggest that CBD’s cytotoxic and anti-proliferative properties may be suitable as a treatment for cancer, and we hypothesized that CBD would also be able to induce apoptosis other cancer models in a dose-response manner. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effect of CBD on viability and cytotoxicity in two tumor forming cell lines, prostate cancer (LNCap) and breast cancer (MCF-7). Briefly, we exposed LNCap and MCF7 cell lines to various concentrations of cannabidiol (5 ug, 10 ug, 15 ug, and 20 ug) over three days, and assessed its effects using three viability and cytotoxicity assays. Our results show the CBD was successful in statistically reducing viability (p=0.02) by 75% in both cell lines at all concentrations tested when exposed to the CBD as early as 48 hours. Additionally, an apoptosis assay demonstrated that CBD was able to induce apoptosis in the LNCap cell line (p=0.01), but not in MCF7, which was statistically lower for apoptosis (p=0.01) compared to the control, implying that CBD might be triggering death through either anoikis or necrosis for MCF7. As these findings lend to the increasing evidence of CBD as a potential viable, alternative, and less harmful treatment option against prostate and breast cancer, our current efforts are focusing on determining the which death pathways (apoptosis, anoikis, necrosis) are triggered by CBD exposure.