Presentation Title

Using natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids

Faculty Mentor

Julian I. Schroeder

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 91

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Heavy metal contamination of drinking water and food sources is becoming an increasing concern in the United States, with arsenic and cadmium being amongst the top 10 toxicants of most concern. These toxicants enter the environment via a plethora of anthropogenic activities such as industry, pesticide spraying, and mining, and are threatening many potable water sources throughout the world. Arabidopsis thaliana is a weed that grows in many regions globally in various levels of toxicity including high levels of heavy metal. More than 100 strains of natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions from around the world were gathered. Seeds from these samples were harvested, sterilized, and placed in growth media to test for their viability to germinate and later transferred onto one of three growth mediums: (1) growth medium, to serve as control (2) arsenic concentrated medium (3) cadmium concentrated medium. These groups were later examined using root growth assays. In a cadmium environment one accession displayed resistance to cadmium with an average percent inhibition growth of [60%]. Meanwhile in arsenic, a different accession exhibited resistance with an average root growth of [50%] relative to its control group. In an arsenic environment two distinct accessions demonstrate sensitivity [2.6%, 4.2%]. Whereas in cadmium, another accession demonstrated the most sensitivity [14.2%]. On average, ecotypes performed better in cadmium than arsenic with a sample mean difference of [2.374mm]. Growth in a toxic environments stunted root growth as can be seen by comparing means for each sample group, [3.26mm (in arsenic), 5.63mm (in cadmium), 19.85mm (in growth medium)]. By identifying ecotypes that lie on the extremes of this spectrum of toxicity, genomic sequence and transcriptome analysis can be done to examine gene structure and expression and begin to categorize candidate genes involved in toxic resistance.

Summary of research results to be presented

Heavy metal contamination of drinking water and food sources is becoming an increasing concern in the United States, with arsenic and cadmium being amongst the top 10 toxicants of most concern. These toxicants enter the environment via a plethora of anthropogenic activities such as industry, pesticide spraying, and mining, and are threatening many potable water sources throughout the world. Arabidopsis thaliana is a weed that grows in many regions globally in various levels of toxicity including high levels of heavy metal. More than 100 strains of natural Arabidopsis accessions from around the world were gathered, harvested, sterilized, and placed in growth medium to test for their viability to germinate and later transferred onto one of three treatment mediums: (1) no treatment (2) arsenic (3) cadmium. These groups were later examined using root growth assays. In a cadmium environment one accession displayed resistance with an average percent inhibition growth of [60%]. Meanwhile in arsenic, a different accession exhibited resistance with an average root growth of [50%] relative to its control group. In an arsenic environment two distinct accessions demonstrate sensitivity [2.6%, 4.2%]. Whereas in cadmium, another accession demonstrated the most sensitivity [14.2%]. On average, ecotypes performed better in cadmium than arsenic with a sample mean difference of [2.374mm]. Growth in a toxic environments stunted root growth, with means of [3.26mm (in arsenic), 5.63mm (in cadmium), 19.85mm (in growth medium)]. By identifying ecotypes that lie on the extremes of this spectrum of toxicity, genomic sequence and transcriptome analysis can be done to examine gene structure and expression to begin categorizing candidate genes involved in toxic resistance.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Using natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids

CREVELING 91

Heavy metal contamination of drinking water and food sources is becoming an increasing concern in the United States, with arsenic and cadmium being amongst the top 10 toxicants of most concern. These toxicants enter the environment via a plethora of anthropogenic activities such as industry, pesticide spraying, and mining, and are threatening many potable water sources throughout the world. Arabidopsis thaliana is a weed that grows in many regions globally in various levels of toxicity including high levels of heavy metal. More than 100 strains of natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions from around the world were gathered. Seeds from these samples were harvested, sterilized, and placed in growth media to test for their viability to germinate and later transferred onto one of three growth mediums: (1) growth medium, to serve as control (2) arsenic concentrated medium (3) cadmium concentrated medium. These groups were later examined using root growth assays. In a cadmium environment one accession displayed resistance to cadmium with an average percent inhibition growth of [60%]. Meanwhile in arsenic, a different accession exhibited resistance with an average root growth of [50%] relative to its control group. In an arsenic environment two distinct accessions demonstrate sensitivity [2.6%, 4.2%]. Whereas in cadmium, another accession demonstrated the most sensitivity [14.2%]. On average, ecotypes performed better in cadmium than arsenic with a sample mean difference of [2.374mm]. Growth in a toxic environments stunted root growth as can be seen by comparing means for each sample group, [3.26mm (in arsenic), 5.63mm (in cadmium), 19.85mm (in growth medium)]. By identifying ecotypes that lie on the extremes of this spectrum of toxicity, genomic sequence and transcriptome analysis can be done to examine gene structure and expression and begin to categorize candidate genes involved in toxic resistance.