Presentation Title

Isolating and Screening of Antibiotic-Producing Bacteria

Faculty Mentor

Stacey Peterson

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 96

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Few treatments for bacterial infections existed before antibiotics were discovered in the 20th century. Antibiotics can stop bacterial growth and help cure individuals, but as with any medication, they have their limitations. Antibiotics eliminate most of the bacteria, but a few resistant cells may remain. These resistant cells replicate and spread the resistance trait to other cells, leading to populations of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. Many scientists are looking for alternative methods or new antibiotics to treat infections caused by these superbugs. The goal of our research is to isolate antibiotic-producing bacteria from the soil in hopes of identifying a new antibiotic. To begin our study, soil samples were collected, and bacteria were isolated. The bacteria were then screened against other bacteria to test whether they inhibit their growth. Four antibiotic producers were found, and their 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR. Three samples were sent out to be sequenced. Of these three samples, one was identified to possibly be Streptomyces gardneri; the other two were unidentified. Our next step is to further evaluate the antibiotic-producing activity of the isolates. Also, we will continue testing other samples that have been collected and redo the PCR and sequencing of our unidentified antibiotic producers. Ultimately, we hope to isolate a new antibiotic and submit it to our collaborators for further analysis.

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Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Isolating and Screening of Antibiotic-Producing Bacteria

CREVELING 96

Few treatments for bacterial infections existed before antibiotics were discovered in the 20th century. Antibiotics can stop bacterial growth and help cure individuals, but as with any medication, they have their limitations. Antibiotics eliminate most of the bacteria, but a few resistant cells may remain. These resistant cells replicate and spread the resistance trait to other cells, leading to populations of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. Many scientists are looking for alternative methods or new antibiotics to treat infections caused by these superbugs. The goal of our research is to isolate antibiotic-producing bacteria from the soil in hopes of identifying a new antibiotic. To begin our study, soil samples were collected, and bacteria were isolated. The bacteria were then screened against other bacteria to test whether they inhibit their growth. Four antibiotic producers were found, and their 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR. Three samples were sent out to be sequenced. Of these three samples, one was identified to possibly be Streptomyces gardneri; the other two were unidentified. Our next step is to further evaluate the antibiotic-producing activity of the isolates. Also, we will continue testing other samples that have been collected and redo the PCR and sequencing of our unidentified antibiotic producers. Ultimately, we hope to isolate a new antibiotic and submit it to our collaborators for further analysis.