Presentation Title

The Effects of Serotonin and Mianserin on the Heart Rate of the Pond Snail Helisoma trivolvis in Satiated and Fasting States

Faculty Mentor

Kenneth Long

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 12

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine: 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter that has been shown to be involved in the feeding response and hunger state processes of mollusks. Some studies have investigated how 5-HT and its antagonists may affect the heart by monitoring heart contraction, but few have combined these topics to discuss the relationship between the hunger state, 5-HT, and the heart. The effects of 5-HT and the 5-HT receptor antagonist mianserin on the heart rate (HR) of the pond snail Helisoma trivolvis when satiated and fasting were tested. It was expected that the HR of fasting H. trivolvis would increase when exposed to 5-HT and decrease when exposed to mianserin. Fasted and satiated pond snails were exposed to control artificial pond water and varying concentrations of 5-HT and mianserin. Contractions of the heart were viewed and recorded using a cell phone attached to a dissecting microscope. HR was measured immediately, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes after 5-HT and mianserin solution exposure. The HR of fasting snails significantly decreased for most snail size ranges (P < 0.05). 5-HT significantly increased HR in fasting snails immediately and up to 60 minutes after exposure, while only increasing HR after 30 minutes exposure for satiated snails (P < 0.05). Mianserin significantly lowered the HR after 30 minutes and up to 60 minutes exposure for fasting snails and with satiated snails immediately and up to 60 minutes after exposure (P < 0.05). Mianserin also reversed the effects of 5-HT for satiated snails after immediate exposure and up to 60 minutes exposure, but for fasting snails immediately and after 30 minutes exposure (P < 0.05). This research should assist in uncovering the systems that govern the heartbeat and how they may be influenced by outside factors such as metabolism.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

The Effects of Serotonin and Mianserin on the Heart Rate of the Pond Snail Helisoma trivolvis in Satiated and Fasting States

HARBESON 12

Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine: 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter that has been shown to be involved in the feeding response and hunger state processes of mollusks. Some studies have investigated how 5-HT and its antagonists may affect the heart by monitoring heart contraction, but few have combined these topics to discuss the relationship between the hunger state, 5-HT, and the heart. The effects of 5-HT and the 5-HT receptor antagonist mianserin on the heart rate (HR) of the pond snail Helisoma trivolvis when satiated and fasting were tested. It was expected that the HR of fasting H. trivolvis would increase when exposed to 5-HT and decrease when exposed to mianserin. Fasted and satiated pond snails were exposed to control artificial pond water and varying concentrations of 5-HT and mianserin. Contractions of the heart were viewed and recorded using a cell phone attached to a dissecting microscope. HR was measured immediately, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes after 5-HT and mianserin solution exposure. The HR of fasting snails significantly decreased for most snail size ranges (P < 0.05). 5-HT significantly increased HR in fasting snails immediately and up to 60 minutes after exposure, while only increasing HR after 30 minutes exposure for satiated snails (P < 0.05). Mianserin significantly lowered the HR after 30 minutes and up to 60 minutes exposure for fasting snails and with satiated snails immediately and up to 60 minutes after exposure (P < 0.05). Mianserin also reversed the effects of 5-HT for satiated snails after immediate exposure and up to 60 minutes exposure, but for fasting snails immediately and after 30 minutes exposure (P < 0.05). This research should assist in uncovering the systems that govern the heartbeat and how they may be influenced by outside factors such as metabolism.