Presentation Title

The Effects of Pollution on Insect Species Richness and Abundance

Faculty Mentor

David Mbora

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 2

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Urbanization has caused habitat fragmentation to occur at an increasing rate. The division of habitats into smaller more isolated fragments is to blame for the reduced abundance and disappearance of certain insect species. In urban areas noise is a factor that negatively affects insect and species richness. Noise pollution can change rapidly, making it difficult for the insect species to adapt appropriately. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore how noise pollution influences insect abundance and species richness in urban areas.

I predicted that areas with high levels of noise pollution would be home to fewer insect species, because they are affected constantly by pollution. Thus, the more pristine areas with lower levels of noise pollution would be home to the largest quantity of species, in terms of both the abundance individuals and species richness. To test these predictions, I sampled arthropods with pitfall traps in a highly noise polluted area, Wright Middle School, and two presumably pristine urban areas Ballona Wetlands Ecological Reserve and Portuguese Bend Ecological Reserve. Ground insects are subject to higher rates of pollution because of automobile traffic and human contact.

In all three areas studied, 13 orders and 39 species of arthropods were identified. 9 orders and 22 species at the Ballona Wetlands, 9 orders and 19 species at Portuguese Bend and 7 orders and 17 species were found at Wright Middle School. Both the species richness and abundance of individuals were lowest at Wright Middle School and highest at the Ballona Wetlands. Thus, the area with the highest level of noise pollution, the Wetlands, with decibel levels above 65 had higher species richness and abundance. ANOVA, p=67.72, F<1. The most pristine area, Portuguese Bend did not have the highest abundance nor species. The original hypothesis was not supported.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

The Effects of Pollution on Insect Species Richness and Abundance

HARBESON 2

Urbanization has caused habitat fragmentation to occur at an increasing rate. The division of habitats into smaller more isolated fragments is to blame for the reduced abundance and disappearance of certain insect species. In urban areas noise is a factor that negatively affects insect and species richness. Noise pollution can change rapidly, making it difficult for the insect species to adapt appropriately. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore how noise pollution influences insect abundance and species richness in urban areas.

I predicted that areas with high levels of noise pollution would be home to fewer insect species, because they are affected constantly by pollution. Thus, the more pristine areas with lower levels of noise pollution would be home to the largest quantity of species, in terms of both the abundance individuals and species richness. To test these predictions, I sampled arthropods with pitfall traps in a highly noise polluted area, Wright Middle School, and two presumably pristine urban areas Ballona Wetlands Ecological Reserve and Portuguese Bend Ecological Reserve. Ground insects are subject to higher rates of pollution because of automobile traffic and human contact.

In all three areas studied, 13 orders and 39 species of arthropods were identified. 9 orders and 22 species at the Ballona Wetlands, 9 orders and 19 species at Portuguese Bend and 7 orders and 17 species were found at Wright Middle School. Both the species richness and abundance of individuals were lowest at Wright Middle School and highest at the Ballona Wetlands. Thus, the area with the highest level of noise pollution, the Wetlands, with decibel levels above 65 had higher species richness and abundance. ANOVA, p=67.72, F<1. The most pristine area, Portuguese Bend did not have the highest abundance nor species. The original hypothesis was not supported.