Presentation Title

Evolution and distribution of a group I intron (LAGLI-DADG homing endonuclease) in Hexacorallia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa)

Faculty Mentor

Catherine McFadden, Andrea Quattrini

Start Date

17-11-2018 8:30 AM

End Date

17-11-2018 10:30 AM

Location

CREVELING 110

Session

POSTER 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

In this study, we use the thirteen protein-coding mitochondrial genes of 179 species in Hexacorallia (Cnidaria:Anthozoa) to construct a phylogenetic tree and map the distribution of the presence of a group I intron. This group I intron contains a LAGLI-DADG homing endonuclease gene (HEG) and, when present, is found in the cox1 gene. This HEG is often found in sponges and cnidarians, but for unknown reasons, it is generally rare in Metazoa. It is understood to be a selfish genetic element that uses its highly conserved ribozyme structure to insert itself at a phenotypically neutral recognition sequence without damaging the host. To construct the phylogeny, we combined 102 complete mitochondrial genomes from NCBI’s GenBank with 77 de novo assemblies from all hexacoral orders. The distribution of the intron within the tree followed an irregular pattern. Some orders were homogenous for presence of the intron; in other orders, intron presence varied between species. For instance, all 14 species we observed in Corallimorpharia had the HEG. Meanwhile, in Actiniaria, even confamilial species differed in their intron presence. These data indicate multiple gain-loss events of the HEG within the phylogeny of Hexacorallia. Future studies could focus on determining whether the HEGs are functional. Potential applications of the intron for barcoding could also be explored.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 8:30 AM Nov 17th, 10:30 AM

Evolution and distribution of a group I intron (LAGLI-DADG homing endonuclease) in Hexacorallia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa)

CREVELING 110

In this study, we use the thirteen protein-coding mitochondrial genes of 179 species in Hexacorallia (Cnidaria:Anthozoa) to construct a phylogenetic tree and map the distribution of the presence of a group I intron. This group I intron contains a LAGLI-DADG homing endonuclease gene (HEG) and, when present, is found in the cox1 gene. This HEG is often found in sponges and cnidarians, but for unknown reasons, it is generally rare in Metazoa. It is understood to be a selfish genetic element that uses its highly conserved ribozyme structure to insert itself at a phenotypically neutral recognition sequence without damaging the host. To construct the phylogeny, we combined 102 complete mitochondrial genomes from NCBI’s GenBank with 77 de novo assemblies from all hexacoral orders. The distribution of the intron within the tree followed an irregular pattern. Some orders were homogenous for presence of the intron; in other orders, intron presence varied between species. For instance, all 14 species we observed in Corallimorpharia had the HEG. Meanwhile, in Actiniaria, even confamilial species differed in their intron presence. These data indicate multiple gain-loss events of the HEG within the phylogeny of Hexacorallia. Future studies could focus on determining whether the HEGs are functional. Potential applications of the intron for barcoding could also be explored.