Presentation Title

Inflammation and Wound Healing Following Hypochlorous Acid Treatment in Post-Surgical Canine Patients

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Cord Brundage

Start Date

17-11-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

17-11-2018 2:30 PM

Location

HARBESON 29

Session

POSTER 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Hypochlorous acid (HA) is an oxyacid of chlorine containing a monovalent chlorine that acts as an oxidizing or reducing agent. Hypochlorous solution has been used in wound care because of its disinfectant properties. Anecdotally, claims have been reported of increased wound closure rates and a reduction in wound inflammation following HA use. In a double-blind study, we investigated the effects of HA in post-surgical incision healing. Canine patients (n=15) receiving either castration or mass removal surgical procedures were treated topically with either 0.015% HA spray or a placebo every 12 hours for 7 days. Incisions were evaluated every 48 hours for 7 days post-op. Inflammation, including erythema (redness), swelling, drainage, and wound contracture rate, were scored individually and collectively in a composite qualitative scale. Male castration surgical patients demonstrated the greatest incidence of inflammation, regardless of their treatment type. However, in all cases, the greatest reduction in inflammation and degree of wound contracture rate were noted on the incisions between post-surgical days 3 and 7. These results show that HA has the potential to expedite healing and affect the incidence on inflammation in canine post-surgical incisions.

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Nov 17th, 12:30 PM Nov 17th, 2:30 PM

Inflammation and Wound Healing Following Hypochlorous Acid Treatment in Post-Surgical Canine Patients

HARBESON 29

Hypochlorous acid (HA) is an oxyacid of chlorine containing a monovalent chlorine that acts as an oxidizing or reducing agent. Hypochlorous solution has been used in wound care because of its disinfectant properties. Anecdotally, claims have been reported of increased wound closure rates and a reduction in wound inflammation following HA use. In a double-blind study, we investigated the effects of HA in post-surgical incision healing. Canine patients (n=15) receiving either castration or mass removal surgical procedures were treated topically with either 0.015% HA spray or a placebo every 12 hours for 7 days. Incisions were evaluated every 48 hours for 7 days post-op. Inflammation, including erythema (redness), swelling, drainage, and wound contracture rate, were scored individually and collectively in a composite qualitative scale. Male castration surgical patients demonstrated the greatest incidence of inflammation, regardless of their treatment type. However, in all cases, the greatest reduction in inflammation and degree of wound contracture rate were noted on the incisions between post-surgical days 3 and 7. These results show that HA has the potential to expedite healing and affect the incidence on inflammation in canine post-surgical incisions.